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An Interview with Bailey DeSimone, Library Technician (Metadata)

Today’s interview is with Bailey DeSimone, a Library Technician (Metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. What is your academic/professional history? I received my bachelor’s degrees in history and global studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From my second week of classes as a first-year to my final […]

An Interview with Alison Trulock, an Associate Archivist in the Office of Art and Archives within the Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives

What is your academic and professional history? I graduated with a BA in English and worked for about five years in editorial and project management positions in the book publishing industry. I decided to go back to graduate school, intending to be a librarian. I attended the School of Information at the University of Michigan-Ann […]

Celebrating International Women’s Day and Averil Deverell, Ireland’s First Female Barrister

In 2015, Kelly Buchanan compiled a series of posts to celebrate Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day with contributions from foreign law specialists, analysts, and interns at the Law Library of Congress. The final post in the series, Women and History: Lawyers and Judges, features the stories of the first women lawyers and judges from 19 different […]

Mary Ann Shadd Cary: Lawyer, Educator, Suffragist

Washington, D.C. is a nexus for high achievers, accomplished folks, and never-satisfied attention-seekers. In the wash of history, some of Washington’s brighter lights get lost—especially those whose history gets lost because of intersectionality. Mary Ann Shadd Cary is a prime example; she was a polymath whose unswerving quest for equality made her less popular than […]

Women, Baseball and the Law

The Library of Congress’s Baseball Americana exhibit gives me something new to think about each time I visit. Most intriguing to me (well, right up there with any mentions of Pittsburgh, the Washington Nationals, Bob Dylan, and my friend Patti’s portrait) are the numerous times women are depicted in the exhibit. Two things stand out from […]

Rhode Island Declares Independence – Pic of the Week

Happy Independence Day (if you live in Rhode Island)! On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island became the first territory to renounce its allegiance to Great Britain and King George III. On this day, the general assembly passed an act, declaring Rhode Island and Providence Plantations an independent state. Providence Plantations refers to the first permanent European […]

Family Voting as a Solution to Low Fertility? Experiences from France and Germany

The following is a guest post by Johannes Jäger, a foreign law intern working in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. I recently read an op-ed in the New York Times in which the author passionately advocated for the introduction of “Demeny voting” in the United States. The concept behind this term, named after the demographer […]

Charles Brent Curtis, first Native American Congressional member

Yesterday, January 25, was the birthday of Charles Brent Curtis, first Native American congressional representative, senator, and the first and only Native American Vice President. Born in 1860 in Kansas to a Kanza mother and a European American father, he was a registered member of the Kaw Nation and was also part Osage and Potawatomi.  […]

Pioneering Women in Congress

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage […]