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Return of a Sámi Drum

Sunday, February 6, marks the Sámi National Day. The Sámi people are indigenous to Sápmi, an area that spans across northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The holiday inspired me to write a post about the recent return of a Sámi Drum to Norway. Last month, the Danish government transferred the legal ownership […]

New Report on the “Lifecycle of Parliamentary Documents” Published

A recent Law Library of Congress report describes the parliamentary document process in 10 jurisdictions around the world. The report, titled the Lifecycle of Parliamentary Documents, summarizes the findings of research conducted by foreign law specialists in the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Directorate based on legal sources from the jurisdictions surveyed. The report is […]

An Introduction to Law Library of Congress Reports & The Most-Viewed Reports of 2021

One of the things that makes the Law Library of Congress so unique is its specialty in foreign, comparative, and international law. It often surprises people to learn that the majority of the Law Library’s collection is in a language other than English. The Law Library’s foreign law collections developed as the United States assumed […]

Santa Laws

If your family celebrates Christmas and expects a visit from Santa Claus, you and yours are hoping for a successful visit from the jolly old elf and his reindeer. Local, federal and foreign governments are doing their regulatory best to speed his mail and ease his journey across borders with foreign livestock, regardless of his […]

New Report on Children and Data Protection Laws in Ireland

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written numerous posts for In Custodia Legis, including 100 Years of “Poppy Day” in the United Kingdom; Weird Laws, or Urban Legends?; FALQs: Brexit Referendum; and The UK’s Legal Response to the London […]

500-Year Anniversary of the Fuggerei – the Oldest Social Housing Complex in the World

This blog post describes the “Fuggerei” in Augsburg, Germany – the oldest existing social housing complex in the world. The Fuggerei was established on August 23, 1521 by Jakob Fugger “the Rich,” a wealthy merchant. In order to be eligible for housing, a person must be Catholic, needy, respectable, and a citizen of Augsburg. The yearly rent is Euros 0.88.

On This Day in 1984: Women’s Suffrage in Liechtenstein

On July 1, 1984, women’s suffrage was introduced in Liechtenstein— making it the last European country to do so. Liechtenstein is situated between Switzerland and Austria and has a total of 38,557 inhabitants. In the 1984 national referendum, a slim majority of 2,370 (male) voters (51.3%) approved the right of Liechtenstein women to vote and […]