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A New View of the Madison Building – Pic of the Week

Posted by: Andrew Weber

For those of you who closely observe In Custodia Legis, you might have noticed that I recently updated my biography on the blog’s About page.  I am now in the Office of the Chief Information Officer of the Library of Congress.  I still work on Congress.gov, I just do it from a new location. We are in …

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Lessons Learned from the AALL 2017 Annual Conference in Austin

Posted by: Andrew Weber

I recently returned from my first visit to Austin, Texas for the 110th American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Annual Meeting and Conference. Hanibal, Tariq, and I hosted a panel, Tech Trends + Transparency.  In it we discussed a new Law Library of Congress report, Features of Parliamentary Websites, by the Law Library’s foreign law specialists.  In the …

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On the Shelf – Library Treaties

Posted by: Betty Lupinacci

As we’ve noted in the blog before, the Class K schedule was not completed until the 1960s.  Prior to that, law material was either classified under the old “LAW” scheme or in the JX class. Our serials cataloger, Brian Kuhagen, is working hard to put everything in order under the K schedule.  His latest projects …

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A Few of my Favorite Things (and People) . . .

Posted by: Robert Brammer

This is a guest post by Tammie Nelson, project manager for Congress.gov. Tammie reflects on her time at the Library of Congress as she prepares to depart to begin work on a PhD in information studies at the University of Maryland iSchool. My first Library of Congress office was in the Madison Building. Eight quotations from our …

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Attorney Advertising in Germany

Posted by: Jenny Gesley

On July 14, 1987, the German Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, BVerfG) rendered two decisions that paved the way to allowing attorney advertising in Germany. Nicknamed the “Bastille decisions” because of the date and their ”revolutionary character,” the decisions allowed attorneys for the first time to advertise their services to the public on a regular basis although several …

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Our Law Librarians at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting

Posted by: Andrew Weber

This post is coauthored by Hanibal Goitom and Andrew Weber. Later this month the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 110th Annual Meeting and Conference will take place in Austin, Texas.  This year’s theme is Forgo the Status Quo.  The Law Library of Congress had multiple proposals accepted for this year’s conference. Jennifer is participating in two panels.  The first is The …

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Symposium on Rights and Resistance: Civil Liberties During Wartime

Posted by: Jim Martin

On Thursday, June 8, the Manuscripts Division in association with the Law Library sponsored a symposium examining the effects of World War I on civil liberties in the United States. Mary Dudziak, of Emory University, provided a historical overview of how Woodrow Wilson went from being reelected as the peace candidate- to in April 1917, requesting a …

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Shylock Mock Appeal – Pic of the Week

Posted by: Donna Sokol

                            The Law Library staged a mock appeal for the Shakespearean character, Shylock, from the play, The Merchant of Venice.  A full re-cap of the mock trial (including video!) is forthcoming, but we wanted to quickly share with you a scene from …