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Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

Caramuel’s Metametrica and the Probability of Law

Richly tessellated fields, icons of altars and Doric columns, glyphs of all-seeing eyes, sun-gods and the man in the moon – Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz’s engravings were meant to be at once mysterious and explanatory, a window for the initiated into a world of speculative arcana. Twenty-five of Caramuel’s engravings displaying an array of anagrams, […]

China’s One Child Policy

In my previous post, which I wrote as a guest blogger (before I had the privilege of joining the club – AKA the Law Library’s blog team), I spoke about the awesome Law Library of Congress tradition known as Power Lunch.  I recently attended a Power Lunch talk on China’s family planning policy (commonly known as […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

The Treaty of Wanghia – Pic of the Week

This week (February 3) saw the start of Chinese New Year celebrations.  To mark the occasion, we thought we’d highlight an interesting China-related item in our collections.  Our great staff that work with our closed stacks located the Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce, Between the United States of America and the Chinese Empire (commonly […]