Pic of the Week: A&E Makes Donation to VHP

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Veterans History Project Director Karen Lloyd present a certificate of appreciation to A&E Networks President and General Manager Jana Bennett following the donation of Pearl Harbor veterans' oral histories. Photo by Shawn Miller.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Veterans History Project Director Karen Lloyd present a certificate of appreciation to A&E Networks President and General Manager Jana Bennett following the donation of Pearl Harbor veterans’ oral histories. Photo by Shawn Miller.

Staff from A&E Networks’ HISTORY stopped by the Library this week to donate interviews from some of our nation’s oldest World War II veterans — specifically those who witnessed the attack on Pearl Harbor. On the eve of the attack’s anniversary, these stories offer meaningful testimony to the American entry into World War II.

These 25 A&E oral history recordings will complement more than 250 VHP Pearl Harbor collections.

There are many evocative manuscripts and recordings among these collections, including Leon Jenkins’ diary. He witnessed the Attack on Pearl Harbor and although his diary begins in 1942, its pages are nothing less than evocative.

Owen Edward Rogers contributed to this post. 

2 Comments

  1. Lance Foss
    December 7, 2016 at 12:28 am

    Are these oral histories from Pearl Harbor veterans in the public domain now? Why or why not?

  2. Erin Allen
    December 7, 2016 at 10:45 am

    Thank you for your comment. These particular oral histories are being processed and should be available for research on-site at the Library mid-2017. The Library already had about 170 collections from Pearl Harbor prior to this new donation. Some of them can be seen/heard here: //www.loc.gov/vets/stories/ex-war-pearlharbor.html. In addition, we also have a collection of man-on-the-street interviews recorded in the days and months following the bombing of Pearl Harbor: //memory.loc.gov/ammem/afcphhtml/afcphhome.html

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