Pic of the Week: Celebrating Cherry Blossoms

A cherry tree in full bloom this week on the grounds of the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, looking toward the John Adams Building. Photo by Shawn Miller.

A cherry tree in full bloom this week on the grounds of the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, looking toward the Adams Building. Photo by Shawn Miller.

The cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., reached peak bloom this week, just in time for the National Cherry Blossom Festival. This year’s festival commemorates the 105th anniversary of the gift of some 3,000 cherry trees to Washington, D.C., from the city of Tokyo in 1912. The trees were given as a symbol of friendship between the United States and Japan. Only nine trees from the original gift remain, two of them located on the grounds of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

A webcast illuminating the history of Washington’s cherry trees, the significance of cherry blossoms in Japan, and their continuing resonance in American culture is available here.

4 Comments

  1. Sharon M.
    March 31, 2017 at 3:39 pm

    That old tree is one of the original ones, if I recall correctly. Always lovely!

  2. Ms. Billie L Hicks-Daly
    April 1, 2017 at 9:37 am

    I was delighted to view the well orchestrated video of the Cherry Blossoms.

    I enjoy learning and sharing information received in my weekly and sometimes daily emails from the Library of Congress.

    Keep up the good work.

    Sincerely,
    Ms. Billie L Hicks-Daly

  3. Cary Michael Cox
    April 1, 2017 at 10:48 am

    Definitely a “Bucket List” item for me.

    I’m sure that as beautiful as they are in pictures, they are more so in person.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Cary Michael Cox

  4. Wanda Lee Hambrick
    April 9, 2017 at 5:37 pm

    Hope some day to see in person, what a national treasure

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