Civil War Diary: “This Hell-Upon-Earth of a Prison”

This is a guest post by Michelle Krowl, a historian in the Manuscript Division, about the experience of Samuel J. Gibson, a Union soldier who was incarcerated in the Confederate military prison in Andersonville, Georgia. He arrived on May 3, 1864—153 years ago today—and his diary is now available online. “I don’t know for whom […]

Inquiring Minds: Copyright Records Hint at Early America’s Preoccupations

Copyright records are a valuable primary source for scholars seeking to understand the development of almost any aspect of American life. So wrote John Y. Cole, Library of Congress historian, in introducing a volume the Library published 30 years ago documenting the nation’s earliest copyright records—those dating from 1790 to 1800. They include copyright registrations […]

World War I: Footlocker’s Contents Reveal Soldier’s Story

This is a guest post by Naomi Coquillon, an education specialist in the Interpretive Programs Office. When I began to develop educational programs for the Library’s new exhibition, Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I, I knew I wanted to give visitors the opportunity to touch objects from the period, to […]