Vote!

Poster shows the hand and arm of a man reaching to press the lever under "Freedom of Enterprise"; other choices on the voting machine are "Freedom of Worship," "Freedom of Speech," and "Freedom of Press."

A 1943 poster encouraging Americans to vote during World War II. Artist: Chester R. Miller. Prints and Photographs Division.

This civic poster from the days of World War II is always a good reminder that the right to vote is something that millions of Americans have fought to earn, protect and defend. It cost something. So, as we always do on Election Day, we encourage you to exercise that right. Vote your conscience. We keep the blog short to give you more time to get there. We’ll see you later in the week.

 

5 Comments

  1. Cherry-Lynn Capuno
    November 8, 2022 at 9:22 am

    “The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age,” states the 26th Amendment (1971).

  2. Ashley
    November 8, 2022 at 10:21 am

    I like it, Cherry-Lynn. I’ll add…

    “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” — the 15th Amendment, U.S. Constitution.

  3. Stephen N Anderson
    November 8, 2022 at 11:06 am

    Adhering to our fundamentals are critical to providing a democracy for the next 250 years.

  4. Roland Magezi
    November 8, 2022 at 2:13 pm

    African American History – I like that

  5. Jennifer
    November 9, 2022 at 9:07 am

    What a strong and powerful reminder of our civic duty to exercise the rights for which they fought.

    The rights we still fight to defend. We need to make sure they fight for a reason we cherish. We need to do our part.

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