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Archive: July 2023 (7 Posts)

Hand tinted lantern slide photo of an elaborate garden with a rectangular swimming pool at the center of the photo.

Free to Use and Reuse — Gardens

Posted by: Neely Tucker

The Library's Free to Use and Reuse set of photographs are a copyright-free collection of photographs, posters and graphics that are available to everyone to use as they wish. Here, we look at three garden photographs with short essays on each. We begin with Frances Benjamin Johnston's famous "Blue Garden."

Dr. Carla Hayden and Tony Bennett pose onstage with the Gershwin Prize.

Remembering Tony Bennett, Gershwin Prize Winner

Posted by: Neely Tucker

Tony Bennett, the Gershwin Prize-winning singer who knew his way around torch ballads, jazz standards and just about every nook and cranny of the Great American Songbook, has passed away at 96. He dazzled and charmed everyone at his Gershwin Prize concert in 2017 and we won't forget him, his grace and his impeccable touch with a song, anytime soon

Three dolls wearing bathing suits line up next to their original boxes.

Barbara Millicent Roberts is at the Library — But Just Call Her Barbie

Posted by: Neely Tucker

Barbara Millicent Roberts debuted in 1959, when Elvis reigned supreme and Berry Gordy had just founded what would become Motown. "The Twilight Zone" dazzled television viewers. Suffice it to say it was a long, long time ago, but Barbie is bigger than ever, thanks to a new film. We take a quick look at the Barbie dolls in our Geppi Collection.

Black and white photo of several men, some in military uniform, inspecting a pile of ashes

Oppenheimer: The Library’s Collection Chronicles His Life

Posted by: Neely Tucker

The stunningly complete, intellectually voracious files of J. Robert Oppenheimer, father of the atomic bomb, are preserved at the Library. The files fill more than 300 boxes that occupy a line of files that would stretch, if stacked end to end, more than 120 feet. That’s not including more than 70 boxes of research files compiled over 20 years by Martin J. Sherwin for his part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, “American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer.” (Kai Bird shared the Pulitzer as a co-writer.) Those stretch another 27 feet. The files tell his epic life story in granular detail.

Crime Classics Returns: “The Thinking Machine”

Posted by: Neely Tucker

The Library's Crime Classics series has just published "The Thinking Machine," Jacques Futrelle's 1907 short story collection. It follows eccentric professor Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen, the Thinking Machine, as he solves a mind-boggling series of crimes. Van Dusen, in the mold of Sherlock Holmes, is “one of the most admired creations in the history of crime fiction," series editor Leslie S. Klinger writes in the introduction.