Pic of the Week: Big Bad Wolf Edition

Page from “Red Riding Hood,” Lydia L.A. Very, 1863. Cover, right. Photos by Shawn Miller.

Frankly, we’ve always wondered about how quick on the uptake Little Red Riding Hood actually was. Not to put too fine a point on it, but if you can’t tell the difference between your granny and a cross-dressing wolf…well. Bless her heart.

It’s Children’s Book Week, so we present you this marvelous 1863 edition of “Red Riding Hood” (she hadn’t achieved “little” status yet), a tiny, 18-page book cut in the shape of the star herself, with the aformentioned wolf at her feet. Written by Lydia Louisa Anna Very (read those middle names again) and published by the Boston publisher L. Prang Co., it survives today in the Library, nearly a century and a half later. Click on the link above to traipse through the deep dark forest for yourself.

Moral of the story: Listen to your mom and make sure granny hasn’t shape-shifted on you since Thanksgiving.

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Join Us for a Serendipity Run – No Sneakers Required

And now for something completely different. On November 8, Jer Thorp, the Library of Congress Innovator-in-Residence, will take over the @LibraryCongress Twitter account to host a #SerendipityRun. What’s a #SerendipityRun? Let’s ask Jer: #SerendipityRun is an experiment in collaborative serendipity. During the run, we’ll see how far and wide we can range across the Library’s […]

Free to Use and Reuse – and Animate! A Parade of Posters

This month, we’re highlighting selections from the Library’s vast international poster collection on our Free to Use and Reuse page – and an animation contest. The posters we’re showcasing – on themes from travel, sports and entertainment to consumer goods and more – reflect a special collaboration between the Library and Poster House, a new […]

Free to Use and Reuse: Pilot Browser Extension Supports Exploration of Historical Images

This is a guest post by Flynn Shannon, who interned this summer in the Library’s Communications Office through the Junior Fellows Program. He is a student at Kenyon College, where he is pursuing a degree in classical mathematics with a concentration in scientific computing. The post was first published on “The Signal,” a blog covering […]

Irish-American Heritage Month: New Resources

To celebrate Irish-American Heritage Month—and of course St. Patrick’s Day!—we’re adding new images to our Free to Use and Reuse archive and releasing a new resources guide associated with the Irish-American experience. Last month, we launched our Free to Use archive featuring sets of themed content: travel posters, presidential portraits, Civil War drawings and all […]

Free to Use and Reuse: Making Public Domain and Rights-Clear Content Easier to Find

One of our biggest challenges is letting you know about all of the content available at loc.gov. Another challenge we have is letting you know what you can do with it (in a nice way). We are working on several fronts to improve the visibility of public domain and rights-clear content. We moved one step […]

Calling All Photo Fans and History Detectives: Flickr Commons, 10th Anniversary

The following is a guest post by Helena Zinkham, chief of the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. It was first published on “Picture This,” the division’s blog. It’s a remarkable achievement for any social media program to still be going strong after 10 years. But the most important part of the Flickr Commons is the […]

Free to Use and Reuse: Selections from the National Film Registry

The Library of Congress is offering film lovers a special gift during the holiday season: Sixty-four motion pictures, named to the Library’s National Film Registry, are now available online. The collection, “Selections from the National Film Registry,” is also available on YouTube. These films are among hundreds of titles that have been tapped for preservation because of […]

Free to Use and Reuse: The Story of Abraham Lincoln

Last week, the Library announced a new online presentation of Abraham Lincoln’s papers from his time as a lawyer, congressman and the 16th president. The refreshed digital collection follows a multiyear project to update the Library’s previous presentation with additional features, full-color images and new material. To celebrate, we’re highlighting items from the Library’s vast […]