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Headlines from America’s Earliest Days

Posted by: Erin Allen

Want to read how an 18th-century newspaper covered the inauguration of George Washington? How about learning what issues divided Congress in the early 1800s? Going back into early American history is now possible due to new digital content that has been added to Chronicling America, the open access database of historic U.S. newspapers that is …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

World War I: When Wurst Came to Worst

Posted by: Erin Allen

(The following post is by Jennifer Gavin, senior public affairs specialist at the Library of Congress.) In the United States, a century ago, there were more than 8 million citizens of German origin or with German ancestry – the largest single group among those of foreign birth or ancestry, but still less than 10 percent …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

New Online: More Presidents & Newspapers

Posted by: Erin Allen

(The following is a guest post by William Kellum, manager in the Library’s Web Services Division.)  July was a relatively quiet month for the Library’s websites, highlighted by the long-planned retirement of THOMAS, covered in this excellent blog post from the Law Library’s In Custodia Legis blog. New in Manuscripts The William Henry Harrison Papers have recently …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

The NEH “Chronicling America” Challenge: Using Big Data to Ask Big Questions

Posted by: Erin Allen

The following cross-post was written by Leah Weinryb Grohsgal of the National Endowment for the Humanities and originally appeared on The Signal: Digital Preservation blog. Historic newspapers offer rich histories of American life, with glimpses into politics, sports, shopping, music, food, health, science, movies and everything in between. The National Digital Newspaper Program, a joint effort …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

World War I: A Wartime Clipping Service

Posted by: Erin Allen

(The following is a post by Arlene Balkansky, reference specialist in the Serial and Government Publications Division, and Will Elsbury, military history specialist in the Humanities and Social Sciences Division.) The Library of Congress’ historical newspaper collections are extensive in their coverage of World War I. From the beginning of the war to America’s involvement to …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

Library in the News: May 2016 Edition

Posted by: Erin Allen

The month of May saw the Library of Congress in a variety of headlines. In April, the Library announced that THOMAS.gov, the online legislative information system, will officially retire July 5, completing the multi-year transition to Congress.gov. David Gewirtz for ZDNet Government wrote, “You have to wonder what Thomas Jefferson would have made of the …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

Library in the News: April 2016 Edition

Posted by: Erin Allen

April headlines covered a wide range of stories about the Library of Congress. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera continues to make the news, especially with the April announcement of his returning for a second term. Herrera told Sara Catania of Reuters that poetry fans provided an “inspiration tsunami” during his first year in which he …

Image of an ornate clock showing 2:05 with sculpted male figures sitting on each side of the clock face

Library in the News: March 2016 Edition

Posted by: Erin Allen

Headlining Library of Congress news for March was the announcement of new selections to the National Recording Registry. Michael O’Sullivan of The Washington Post spoke with singer Gloria Gaynor, whose “I Will Survive” was one of the selections. “For Gaynor, the Library of Congress honor simply acknowledges what the world has already figured out,” he …