Bug Story: The Secret of Pre-Modern Colors

Pre-modern artists used almost anything to create vibrant colors for art and fabrics: bug guts, squid bones, shredded wood, hardened tree sap, walnut rinds, lye, tannic acid, iron sulfate, wine and, um, urine. Today, the Library’s Preservation Research and Testing Division is now recreating those colors the old-fashioned way as part of a newly developing field of preservation science.

Pic of the Week: Marty Stuart Edition

  You never know who will turn up at your favorite national library, and the other day it was none other than country music legend Marty Stuart, who dropped by to visit with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. The Mississippi native started performing professionally as a pre-teen, and grew into a singer, songwriter and multi-threat […]

Pic of the Week

  Taking to the Constitution Hall stage during the Gershwin Prize concert the evening of March 13, co-honoree Gloria Estefan and her daughter, Emily, sang a duet of “Embraceable You,” one of the Gershwin brothers’ standards, near the show’s end. The concert was taped for broadcast on PBS on May 3, 2019.

I Can’t Wait to Slow Down: Looking Forward to Tracy K. Smith on the Air

The following guest post is by Jeff Shotts, executive editor at Graywolf Press, publisher in association with the Library of Congress of the anthology “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time” by U.S. poet laureate Tracy K. Smith. Regular, daily poetry programming on the airwaves has not only been saved, it’s been revitalized. American Public […]

Inquiring Minds: Bringing Radio’s Golden Age Back to Life

Karl Schadow began his lifelong love affair with radio drama in the 1970s when, as a youth in Schenectady, New York, he became a fan of “CBS Radio Mystery Theater.” The program was a surprise hit between 1974 and 1982, appealing to an audience that included many who remembered radio drama fondly as a form […]