Researcher Stories: Walter Stahr

In this segment of a regular feature on authors who use the Library’s collections, we interview Walter Stahr, a lawyer turned historian. His latest biography, published in 2022, is “Salmon P. Chase: Lincoln’s Vital Rival,” a look at the influential treasury secretary and later chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court during the mid 19th century.

The Unexpected (and Illustrated) Dante

Dante Alighieri’s “The Divine Comedy” had been an epic religious and literary work for 150 years when a publisher in Florence attempted to do something that had never been done — illustrate it in a printed book. The year was 1481. Gutenberg’s revolutionary printing press was just 26 years old. Nicolaus Laurentii took on the […]

“The Metropolitan Opera Murders” — Crime Classics Latest

“The Metropolitan Opera Murders,” the latest entry in the Library’s Crime Classics series, is a novel from a woman who knows the score. Helen Traubel, a longtime star soprano who performed at the Met for years, wrote the book in 1951, shortly before she left the opera to pursue a career in popular entertainment.

Trailblazing American Women on Quarters

This is a guest post by Maria Peña, a public relations strategist in the Library’s Office of Communications. Maya Angelou broke ground as a multifaceted author, poet, actress, recording artist and civil rights activist, while Adelina “Nina” Otero-Warren left an indelible mark in New Mexico’s suffrage movement. This year, both are among five trailblazing women […]

“A Christmas Memory,” Truman Capote’s Classic, Handwritten at the Library

“A Christmas Memory,” Truman Capote’s bittersweet short story about his small-town Alabama childhood with his eccentric elderly cousin, has been one of the nation’s most beloved tales in the holiday canon since it was first published in 1956. The Library has Capote’s handwritten draft of the story, which reveals much about the young Capote.