Celebrating Film: ‘Dunkirk’ Director Advocates Film Preservation

This is a post in advance of the announcement this week of this year’s selection of motion pictures to be added to the National Film Registry. Director Christopher Nolan, the subject of this post, is a member of the National Film Preservation Board, which advises the Librarian of Congress regarding selections to the registry. Even in the […]

Pic of the Week: John Cena Thrills Young Readers

World-champion wrestler John Cena (center) visited the Library on December 6 to talk about his latest endeavor: starring as the voice of the gentle bull Ferdinand in a soon-to-be-released 20th Century Fox Animation feature film based on “The Story of Ferdinand the Bull,” the beloved 1936 children’s book by Munro Leaf. Cena read the story […]

My Job at the Library: The Library’s First Official Historian

This post is reprinted from the November–December issue of LCM, the Library of Congress Magazine. The entire issue is available on the Library’s website. John Cole has enjoyed a remarkable 51-year career at the Library, culminating with his most recent appointment as the first official Library of Congress historian. Throughout his long tenure at the […]

Inquiring Minds: Songwriter Finds Inspiration in Library’s Digital Newspapers

Rob Williams first used the Library’s digital newspaper collections more than a decade ago as a high-school teacher of U.S. history in Powhatan County, Virginia, near Richmond. Today, he’s a recording artist—he released his third album, “An Hour Before Daylight,” in October. But he still draws inspiration from the same online resources that captivated his […]

New Acquisition: Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Manuscript

This is a guest post by Benny Seda-Galarza of the Office of Communications. The Codex Quetzalecatzin, an extremely rare Mesoamerican manuscript acquired by the Library’s Geography and Map Division, explores the extent, the people and the history of northern Oaxaca and Southern Puebla in Mexico. Held in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been […]

Veterans History: Spell Checking the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

This is a guest post by Lee Ann Potter, director of educational outreach. Thirty-five years ago this month, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was dedicated. Three years later, in 1985, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund donated its records to the Library of Congress. But the National Archives actually plays […]

Native American Heritage Month: Preserving Songs and Stories of the Past

Judith Gray joined the staff of the American Folklife Center in 1983 with a goal in mind: she wanted to work on the Federal Cylinder Project. The Folklife Center launched the project four years earlier to preserve early field recordings of the sung and spoken traditions of Native American communities. Ethnographers had made the recordings on […]

EverydayLOC: Holiday Inspiration from the Library of Congress

‘Tis the season to be jolly, be of good cheer and…be a thorough list-maker. Gift lists, grocery lists, invitation lists … there are so many things, and so little time that lists are essential to helping us make a bit more sense of it all. The Library offers a lot of great resources that can […]

This Day in History: Painstaking Assassination Investigation Uncovers Strange Side-Story

President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas 54 years ago today. Last month, to much anticipation, historians and the public awaited release by the National Archives of the government’s final records on the investigation into his murder—a law passed in 1992 set October 26, 2017, as the deadline for public disclosure of all assassination-related […]