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Category: Politics

Monochrome portrait of Kelley, facing camera

Florence Kelley and the Feminist Opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1920s

Posted by: Josh Levy

In 1921, when the National Woman’s Party drafted a constitutional amendment declaring equal rights for men and women, one of the most formidable opponents of the amendment was a friend and ally in the suffrage movement. Florence Kelley, a leading reformer and head of the National Consumers’ League, feared the amendment would put hard-earned workplace protections in jeopardy.

Map of the District of Columbia outlined in black.

Home Rule and Go-Go “Live! at the Library,” November 30, 2023

Posted by: Ryan Reft

Join us on November 30 for a “Live! at the Library” commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of home rule in Washington, D.C., with a panel discussion on the legacy of home rule moderated by Kojo Nnamdi and featuring journalist Tom Sherwood; The Drum and Spear Bookstore co-founder, Eyes on the Prize documentarian and civil rights activist Judy Richardson; and historians G. Derek Musgrove and Kyla Sommers. A performance by the D.C. Go-Go band Mambo Sauce will follow the panel discussion.

Reflections on Our First Twenty-First-Century U.S. Presidential Collection: Barack Obama Correspondence and Photographs, 1981-2012

Posted by: Josh Levy

The Manuscript Division recently acquired more than twenty Barack Obama letters, postcards, notes, photographs, and campaign ephemera, most dating from the 1980s. The letters confirm historian Meg McAleer’s fascination with materials emanating from a person’s early professional life.