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The Next Generation: GIS as a Career Choice

________________________________________________________ The following is a guest post by Nina Feldman, a former intern with the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress and the American Association of Geographers. Nina is currently a senior at George Washington University, majoring in Environmental Science and GIS (Geographic Information Systems). She spoke of her inspirations and why […]

Celebrate GIS Day at the Library of Congress on Wednesday, November 16th!

The Library of Congress is proud to celebrate GIS Day, Wednesday November 16th, with a full-day series of talks and discussions highlighting GIS technology, research, resources, and opportunities on Capitol Hill and beyond! The event will kick off at 9am and take place in the room LJ-119 on the First Floor of the Jefferson Building […]

Modern Mapping to Forecast Natural and Human-Induced Earthquakes

As a heavy user of geographic information systems in the Geography and Map Division, I am always interested to see new scientific research that fuses geography and technology in order to advance understanding of our world. Today, Worlds Revealed wanted to highlight the fascinating work of researchers at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in […]

[Computing Space VII] Searching for Magpie and Possum: Contemplating the Algorithmic Nature of Cartographic Space

Today’s post is the seventh in a year-long series called,”Computing Space,” which highlights new mapping technologies and new areas for cartographic innovation, along with stories of the lives and work of many of the mostly unknown cartographers, geographers, mathematicians, computer scientists, designers and architects who both now, and in the past, have had a hand […]

Computing Space VI: The Many Languages of Space or How to Read Marble and Dacey

Today’s post is the sixth in a year-long series called,”Computing Space,” which highlights new mapping technologies and new areas for cartographic innovation, along with stories of the lives and work of many of the mostly unknown cartographers, geographers, mathematicians, computer scientists, designers and architects who both now, and in the past, have had a hand […]

North Korea Uncovered: The Crowd-Sourced Mapping of the World’s Most Secret State

Today’s guest post is by Ryan Moore, a Cartographic Specialist in the Geography and Map Division. Mr. Moore earned a Master’s degree in History from Cleveland State University and a Master’s of Library Science from Kent State University. He is the chief editor and a contributor for the Division’s journal, The Occasional Papers. He teaches […]

Computing Space IV: William Bunge and The Philosophy of Maps

Today’s post is the fourth of a series called,”Computing Space,” which highlights the lives and work of many of the mostly unknown cartographers, geographers, mathematicians, computer scientists, designers and architects who had a hand in the birth of today’s computer cartography, along with some of forgotten publications from the early years of GIS. In the […]

Computing Space III: Papers of the “Father of GIS” Come to the Library of Congress

Today’s post is the third of a series called,”Computing Space,” which will highlight the lives and work of many of the mostly unknown cartographers, geographers, mathematicians, computer scientists, designers and architects who had a hand in the birth of today’s computer cartography.  ’Amateur’ field geographers can speak with authority about the clarifying effects on the […]