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Society of Woman Geographers Coming to the Library of Congress

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Geographers (AAG) takes place in Washington DC this year and with the conference come thousands of geographers of all stripes, from across this vibrant and rapidly expanding discipline. This year the association will give one its highest honors, the Atlas Award, to the Librarian of Congress, Dr. Carla Hayden, who is the first women to serve in the position.

In the days leading up to the annual conference, which will be held from Wednesday, April 3 to Sunday, April 7, the Library of Congress’ Geography and Map Division will host a program co-sponsored by the Society of Woman Geographers called, “From Earth to Sky: Women Making a Difference in Geography.”

This all-day conference, to be held on April 2, will explore the contributions women have made to the field of geography and inspire participants to consider how women strengthen the practice of geography today through a series of illustrated presentations and “En-Lightning Talks” by some of the leading experts in the field including Nancy Lewis, Kavita Pandit, and Susan Shaw. As part of the conference, attendees are invited to an open house in the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress where some of Library’s cartographic and geographic treasures will be on display.

Map made by Anna Beeck (1657-1717), part of the Collection of Plans and Fortifications, 1684-1709. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

Map made by Anna Beeck (1657-1717), part of the Collection of Plans and Fortifications, 1684-1709. Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress.

Papers will cover the long history of women in geography and cartography and will focus on methods for advancing the role of women in geographic science and research. Welcoming remarks will be given by Dr. Paulette Hasier, the first woman to serve as Chief of the Geography and Map Division, and by Dr. Mollie Webb, President of the Society of Women Geographers. Katherine Hart, head of the Geography and Map Division Reference Team and Reading Room and Dr. Stephanie Stillo, Curator of the Lessing Rosenwald Collection in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division, both of the Library of Congress, will participate in one of the “En-lightening” sessions called The Art, Science, and Women of Cartography.  Details and the complete conference schedule can be found here.

The event will be held in the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress and is free and open to the public. Space is limited however, and those interested in attending should register here by March 26, 2019.

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