Pic of the Week: Deck the Halls with Koussevitzky Edition

 Installation photo by Pat Padua.

Head of Acquisitions and Processing Denise Gallo recently pointed out the ingenuity of her staff’s  Christmas tree, festively adorned with photocopied highlights from the Music Division’s deep coffers. The elves who assembled this holiday centerpiece were the music specialists and technicians who work in the archival processing section.  Gallo notes that the tree is also constructed of  “miniature archival folders and boxes, a tiny box full of Christmas music (yes, tiny pieces of sheet music!) sent to the Music Division by Santa at the North Pole, and a garland made up of paper clips and the leftover nubs of used pencils (the erasers look amazingly like colored lights!)” How many of the artists pictured can you name without peeking at the credits below?

Revisit our previous Christmas musings on “Jingle Bells” and “White Christmas,”  and don’t miss the young Gerry Mulligan’s Christmas tree. And from our friends across the transom in Recorded Sound, enjoy this week’s Record of the Week from the National Juekbox, “The Night before Christmas” performed by Len Spencer & Gilbert Girard.

In the Muse wishes everyone a happy and safe holiday season.

Photo credits, counter-clockwise from center:

2 Comments

  1. Fredrick Rea O’Keefe
    December 23, 2011 at 10:09 am

    Thanks for this holiday treat. Our LoC is a great treasure. Your hard work isn’t unappreciated.

  2. Barbara Zollinger Sweney PhD
    December 23, 2011 at 10:39 am

    Every e-mail I receive from the Library of Congress is a cause for joy. I am grateful for all the hard work of the staff and the challenging and stimulating communications I receive. Thank you.

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