Cellist Meets Her Brain Waves

Intelligence Snap

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to play a duet with your brain waves? On October 16 you can find out what that sounds like, in a performance experience that is unique to Concerts from the Library of Congress.

Renowned cellist Katinka Kleijn, of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and International Contemporary Ensemble, will offer the DC premiere of her groundbreaking project Intelligence in the Human-Machine for Library Late, the late-night, club style concerts that the Library presents at the Atlas Performing Arts Center. Kleijn will be joined by composer Daniel R. Dehaan and engineer Levy Lorenzo to transform the traditional concert hall into an experimental theater.

To perform Intelligence in the Human-Machine Kleijn wears an EEG headset that monitors brain signals. Dehaan and Lorenzo in turn mix these brain waves with electronic sounds that are dispatched individually to eight different speakers around the space. Time magazine describes Kleijn’s performance as “a balancing act for her whole body,” as she utilizes her physicality and cello to interact with the electronic sounds.

Audience members will have the opportunity to move around the performance space to experience the different sound relationships. The intersection of music, art and technology will be on display as guests immerse themselves in a sound world that may be completely unfamiliar. Here’s a preview clip of the world premiere performance of Intelligence in the Human Machine.

Courtesy of Katinka Kleijn

Courtesy of Katinka Kleijn

Kleijn will also perform works for solo cello, and cello with electronics by composers D. Gabrielli, Balter, Dai Fujikura, and Du Yun.

Intelligence in the Human-Machine is presented in association with BrightestYoungThings and Technofiles, a series of Library of Congress events that explores how technology influences the ways we create, perform and experience music.

Intelligence in the Human-Machine, October 16, 2014, 9:00pm. Atlas Performing Arts Center (1333 H Street, NE). Free tickets required from atlasarts.org or (202) 399-7993.

Program Booklet

Technical Notes for Intelligence in the Human-Machine

2 Comments

  1. Ronald Armando Baro
    October 6, 2014 at 4:49 pm

    I would love to learn how to do this or be a Participant in hearing my brainwaves how do I do it? I am a Muti-indtrumentaliist Vocalist, I do Salsa music

    • Nicholas A. Brown
      November 24, 2014 at 10:28 am

      Dear Ronald,
      Thanks for your interest. You should try contacting Daniel R. Dehaan, the composer of the “Intelligence in the Human-Machine” project. He has a public website that you can find via search engines. He can likely give you more information about the technology involved.
      Best wishes,
      The “In the Muse” Team

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