Hear from Jeanine Tesori, Steven Lutvak & David Yazbek on World Theater Day

Happy World Theater Day! We are pleased to release a special interview for this global celebration of stagecraft. Learn more below:

On October 17, 2014, Concerts from the Library of Congress presented an evening with leading contemporary Broadway composers Jeanine Tesori, David Yazbek and Steven Lutvak. These three distinguished, award-winning creators represent a diverse set of styles that represent American musical theater in the 21st century. Following the concert, these wonderful artists spent a few minutes chatting with our very own musical theater guru, Mark Eden Horowitz (Senior Music Specialist, Music Division, Library of Congress). We’re pleased to make this audio available to you here.

ADVISORY: Some information in the following presentation may not be suitable for young viewers. Discretion is advised.
Transcript


Musical Theater at the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress Music Division is home to many major collections related to musical theater, including the papers of Irving Berlin, George & Ira Gershwin, Richard Rodgers, Victor Herbert, Jonathan Larson, Oliver Smith, Frederick Loewe, Peggy Clark, and Marvin Hamlisch. In addition, the Library currently has on display a major exhibition on theatrical design, called “Grand Illusion.” Visit us in the James Madison Building between 8:30am-5:00pm (Monday-Saturday).

We love showtunes. Have a great weekend!

 

Images Courtesy of the Artists

Images Courtesy of the Artists

 

July 27, 2020 Edits: Melissa Wertheimer updated links in the “Musical Theater at the Library of Congress” section to finding aid permalinks and online catalog record permalinks.

One Comment

  1. Sabri
    September 25, 2015 at 1:48 pm

    Thanks for spreading the word. I am rellay excited about your topic: Beyond the library’s walls. As someone who grew up in libraries before computers, I still have so much to learn about what I can do there now.

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