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Category: African American History

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Andrew White: “Petey, Me and the Library of Congress”

Posted by: Nicholas A. Brown-Cáceres

The following is a guest blog by Andrew N. White III, a participant in the Library’s DC Jazz Project, a component of the 2016-2017 Library of Congress Jazz Scholars program. This program is made possible by the Reva and David Logan Foundation. White delivered a lecture-recital at the Library on November 3, 2016 (a video …

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Protest Songs Roundtable: Civil Rights, Unions, Immigrants and Stonewall

Posted by: Nicholas A. Brown-Cáceres

This Thursday the Music Division is pleased to present an engaging roundtable discussion that will examine the role of protest songs from the 1960s in shaping contemporary American culture. This program is part of a series of events at the Library of Congress that commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, which took …

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“We’ll walk hand in hand someday” – Music and the March on Washington

Posted by: Nicholas A. Brown-Cáceres

Our nation is in the midst of commemorating one of the single most significant days in our history, the March on Washington of August 28, 1963. That momentous occasion has shaped generations of Americans, from activists to community leaders and the President of the United States to the singer-songwriter performing original songs in an eclectic …

Woman with dark hair, fancy dress and pearls with eyes closed and mouth slightly open, singing

Chuck Wayne, Sonny & Solar

Posted by: Larry Appelbaum

(photo by Tom Marcello) Chuck Wayne [Charles Jagelka 1923-1997] was a guitarist and teacher who helped bridge the swing era with the modernist bebop revolution of the mid-1940s. Wayne worked along 52nd Street and took part in recording sessions with Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Dizzy Gillespie, Barney Bigard and many others. He was a member …

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Pic of the Week: Happy Birthday Alvin Ailey Edition

Posted by: Pat Padua

The following is a guest post by Denise Gallo, Head of Acquisitions and Processing. Many people may be under the misconception that the Music Division only collects music. Despite our division’s title, the name of our reading room, Performing Arts, actually describes our holdings far more accurately. So, in addition to music, we also boast …

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Happy Birthday John Coltrane!

Posted by: Pat Padua

One of the great tenor (and soprano) saxophone voices, composer John Coltrane was born on September 23, 1926.  The Music Division has a number of  lead sheets that Coltrane submitted to copyright for compositions such as “Blue Train” and “Moment’s Notice.” The Library is also home to a set of tapes recorded at a performance by …

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Happy Birthday Prez and Bird

Posted by: Pat Padua

Today, as will happen every other Friday for the next several months, additional batches of photographs from the William P. Gottlieb Collection have been uploaded to Flickr . This week’s set is particularly varied, with classic portraits of Duke Ellington, Billy Eckstine, Tommy Dorsey,  Doris Day, Nat “King” Cole, and Perry Como.  In addition to these portraits are …

Woman with dark hair, fancy dress and pearls with eyes closed and mouth slightly open, singing

Happy Birthday Count Basie

Posted by: Pat Padua

Pianist, bandleader, composer, William “Count” Basie was born on this day in 1904. Some of the greatest names in jazz passed through his band, from tenor legend Lester Young to singers like Bille Holiday, Jimmy Rushing, and Joe Williams, just to name three. Basie’s career spanned fifty years and did not shy from whatever music happened …