{ subscribe_url:'/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/national-book-festival.php' }

#tbt Festival Posters in Review

2001 Inaugural National Book Festival Poster designed by Lu Ann Barrow.

2001 Inaugural National Book Festival Poster designed by Lu Ann Barrow.

Online social networks are a great way to keep in contact with people you know and have known. I love that my Facebook account let’s me keep up with people from many facets of my life, past and present – from grade school to grad school, dance classes, mom groups, travels, etc. One of my favorite things is Throwback Thursday, #tbt, where folks post pictures that inspire a walk down memory lane. There’s nothing quite like seeing a photo from your high school graduation posted and being informed that people born that year would now be the legal age… that may or may not have happened last week.

At any rate, as we prepare to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the National Book Festival, what better way to take a look back then with our own #tbt posts? And, since our 2015 festival poster designed by Peter de Sève was just announced, let’s start with a look back in the poster gallery at the festival posters and the many illustrators who’ve designed them over the years.

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Aug. 29. You can get up-to-the-minute news, schedule updates and other important festival information by subscribing to this blog. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You too can support the festival by making a gift now.

One Comment

  1. Emily
    June 12, 2015 at 2:44 pm

    Love the poster gallery, with 2003 //www.loc.gov/bookfest/pdf/posters/2003.pdf possibly being my favorite (it’s so difficult to choose!)

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.