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Great Names, Great Space for History & Biography

Eric Deggans (center) moderates a panel with Catherine Kerrison (left) and Erica Armstrong Dunbar on the History & Biography Stage at the 2018 National Book Festival, Photo by Shawn Miller.

If you’re a regular attendee at the Library of Congress National Book Festival, you know that our History & Biography Stage is always one of the most popular venues. And if this is your first festival, this stage is where we feature some of the most prominent nonfiction authors who write about the people and events that have influenced our era.

Either way, you’ll be happy to know that we’ve greatly expanded the seating for this  space, doubling the capacity from 1,250 last year to 2,500 in 2019. And we’ll be certain to need every seat! The line-up for the stage this year is one of our best yet:

Authors appearing in the History & Biography Stage at the 2019 Library of Congress National Book Festival

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Maraniss discusses “A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.”
  • Award-winning Yale professor Joanne B. Freeman talks about her book “The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War.”
  • Brenda Wineapple discusses her culmination of six years of research, “The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation.”
  • Entrepreneur Casey Gerald shares details from his life in his memoir “There Will Be No Miracles Here.”
  • In a conversation on Native American history, Colin G. Calloway discusses “The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans and the Birth of the Nation” and David Treuer discusses “The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present.”
  • Journalist and author Elaine Weiss talks about the women’s suffrage movement and her book, “The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote.”
  • Author, historian and commentator Douglas Brinkley discusses his latest book, “American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race.”
  • Best-selling author and journalist Evan Thomas profiles the first female Supreme Court justice in “First: Sandra Day O’Connor.”
  • And concluding the day on a British note, Andrew Roberts discusses the 20th-century prime minister and political icon in “Churchill: Walking with Destiny” and
  • Pulitzer Prize-winner Rick Atkinson reaches further back into US-UK history in ”The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777.”

You can check out the complete schedule here and start planning your day now. Or download and use the National Book Festival App.

We’re only able to bring you this assemblage of talent through the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, including Wells Fargo, sponsor of the History & Biography Stage and a Charter Sponsor of the National Book Festival since 2011.

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Aug. 29. You can get up-to-the-minute news, schedule updates and other important festival information by subscribing to this blog. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You too can support the festival by making a gift now.

One Comment

  1. Bahram
    August 20, 2019 at 12:15 pm

    I Sinecerly thank the United States and all congress members in the world .Regards thank you.

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