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Put a Spring in Your Step: Reserve Tickets for April Events

Spring is nearly here, and we’re thrilled to keep up that seasonal momentum with two celebratory and historic April events in the National Book Festival Presents series. Reserve your tickets now!

UPDATE: This event has been POSTPONED.

Note: Once a date has been confirmed, the Library of Congress will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

Join us on Thursday, April 2, at 7 p.m., for “A Good Story Knows No Borders,” an event honoring 2019 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner Richard Ford. Ford will give a talk about the universality of fiction as well as participate in a moderated discussion with his German translator, Frank Heibert, and Library of Congress Literary Director Marie Arana.

Register now for your free tickets via Eventbrite. Signed copies of Ford’s latest book, “Between Them,” are available for pre-purchase with ticket registration, and ticketholders are also invited to view a pre-event display of items from the Library’s extensive collections, including pieces related to the event.

UPDATE: This event has been CANCELED.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

To round out National Poetry Month, join us on Thursday, April 30, at 7 p.m., to celebrate Joy Harjo as she closes her term as 23rd U. S. Poet Laureate. The event will include a moderated discussion and special musical performance (more details to come!), and is co-sponsored by the Library’s American Folklife Center and Music Division.

Make sure to snag your free tickets via Eventbrite. Signed copies of Harjo’s latest poetry collection, “An American Sunrise,” are available for pre-purchase with ticket registration, and ticketholders are also invited to explore the Library by viewing a pre-event display featuring collection items related to the event.

If you can’t make it in person, you can catch both events via livestream on the Library’s YouTube site (with captions) and its Facebook page.

We hope to see you in April!

In the meantime, don’t forget about our March events: On March 12, we welcome Margaret Atwood and Nan Talese as part of a new “Great American Editors” feature. On the morning of March 13, join us for the Walter Awards and Symposium (no tickets required), and on March 19 for an evening conversation between Jeffrey Rosen and Dahlia Lithwick.

UPDATE: The Margaret Atwood and Nan Talese event on March 12 has been POSTPONED.
Note: Once a date has been confirmed, the Library of Congress will alert all those who registered for the original event date via their email addresses. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to seeing you, your family and friends very soon.

The Walter Awards on March 13, as well as the Jeffrey Rosen and Dahlia Lithwick event on March 19, have been CANCELED. 


All National Book Festival Presents events are free and open to the public, but most require tickets. Read our recent press release for the full winter and spring National Book Festival Presents event calendar. You can also subscribe here for email updates on ticketing and book sales, and learn more about the series on the National Book Festival Presents website.

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Aug. 29. You can get up-to-the-minute news, schedule updates and other important festival information by subscribing to this blog. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You too can support the festival by making a gift now.

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