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Best of the National Book Festival: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 2019

Welcome to our ongoing celebration of the Library of Congress National Book Festival. Each weekday, we will feature a video presentation from among the thousands of authors who have appeared at the National Book Festival and as part of our new year-long series, National Book Festival Presents. Mondays will feature topical nonfiction; Tuesday: poetry or literary fiction; Wednesday: history, biography, memoir; Thursday: popular fiction; and Friday: authors who write for children and teens. Please enjoy, and make sure to explore our full National Book Festival video collection!

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the 2019 National Book Festival’s Main Stage with co-authors Mary Harnett and Wendy Williams to talk about “My Own Words,” Ginsburg’s selection of essays and speeches on everything from gender equality and opera to, of course, her life on the Supreme Court. By the time the festival doors to the Washington Convention Center opened at 8 AM, hundreds of people had already lined up for a chance to see and hear the Justice, as interviewed by NPR’s Nina Totenberg.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden makes the introductions, and Totenberg begins her interview at 2:40.

One Comment

  1. Sue Zongker
    September 20, 2020 at 10:40 pm

    Thank you for posting!
    I so much enjoyed listening to Ruth speak
    and having a chance to meet her grand daughters!
    PTL!
    Sue

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