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Celebrating Supporters: A Conversation with Dick Robinson of Scholastic

The following is a guest post by Sara Karrer, a senior development officer in the Library’s Development Office.

On the occasion of the 2020 National Book Festival, join us as we go behind the scenes with some of the festival’s loyal supporters.

Scholastic has supported every one of our book festivals, starting back in 2001, and we are grateful for their generous support. Many authors published by Scholastic are joining us this year!

This year is Scholastic’s 100th anniversary helping children learn and grow. Listen to Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Scholastic CEO Dick Robinson discuss the history of the world’s largest publisher and distributor of books for young people and the importance to our democracy of ensuring that children acquire a lifelong love of reading.

The 2020 Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate its 20th birthday this year. You can get up-to-the-minute news, schedule updates and other important festival information by subscribing to this blog. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You can support the festival, too, by making a gift now.

3 Comments

  1. Crystal Skirvin
    September 24, 2020 at 11:51 am

    Thank you! (-:

  2. sherry chastain
    September 24, 2020 at 3:02 pm

    Are these recorded so I can go back and review? I totally missed this today, I was thinking all was going on this weekend.

    • John Sayers
      September 24, 2020 at 3:05 pm

      You’re in luck (and sorry for the misunderstanding)! The National Book Festival takes place Friday, Sept. 25 through Sunday, Sept. 27. Not only that, all of the presentations and live chats will remain available after the festival concludes — register here and get ready for lots of presentations, live Q&As (also recorded for later) and activities in sponsor, partner and Library of Congress booths: //www.loc.gov/bookfest/

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