Top of page

Archive of all 46 Posts

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

19th-Century Tactile Music Notation in Spain

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

Did you know that systems of tactile music notation were created in the 19th century to enable people who were blind to read and write music? Today, we will learn about two systems that were developed and used in Spain before braille music code gained widespread adoption in the 20th century.

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

Alternatives to Braille: 19th-Century Experiments in Tactile Music Notation in the United States

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

Did you know that systems of tactile music notation were created in the United States in the 19th century, long before braille music became the standard? Today, we will learn about two of these systems, both of which were developed at the New York Institute for the Blind.

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

Junior Fellows Enhance Discoverability of Music Resources Related to Blind Musicians–Part 2

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

This is a guest blog post by Library of Congress Junior Fellow Analisa Caso. Analisa describes her contributions to the NLS Music Section during the 10-week-long program.

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

Italian Songs and Arias: A Tale of Two Editions

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

The Italian Songs and Arias compiled by Alessandro Parisotti are perennially popular, and the Alfred edition is now available in braille from the NLS Music Section. But the older Schirmer edition still has much to offer. Learn about these two editions as well as the large-print and audio resources we have to help you practice this standard vocal repertoire.

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

Celebrate Women’s Music History with the Library of Congress!

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

We continue our celebration of Women's History Month with programs from the Library of Congress featuring music made by women. You can now enjoy these concerts, interviews, and lectures as NLS talking books available from the Music Section!

Close-up of the fingers of two hands as the touch a paged filled with raised dots

Before Selena: Lydia Mendoza and More Queens of Tejano Music

Posted by: Lindsay Conway

The Library of Congress recently inducted the 1997 film Selena into the National Film Registry. In today's post, learn about the women who were Queens of Tejano music before Selena's all-too-brief reign.