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Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 22, 2014)

The Packard Campus Theatre typically goes dark on a holiday weekend, so only one show this week…but what a nifty one it is as the first of several films (continuing next week) about auto racing.

Eric Linden and Joan Blondell in The Crowd Roars (Warner Bros., 1932)

Thursday, May 22 (7:30 p.m.)
T
he Crowd Roars (Warner Bros., 1932)
Howard Hawks directed this fast-paced auto-racing story starring James Cagney as top-ranked race-car driver Joe Greer. His younger brother Eddie (Eric Linden) wants to follow in Joe’s footsteps, but knowing his brother’s reckless side, Joe tries to keep him away from the racer’s life. Several famous racing drivers appear in the production including William Arnold, who was the winner of the 1930 Indianapolis 500 race. Joan Blondell, Ann Dvorak and Frank McHugh round out the cast of this sports drama. 35mm print preserved from the original camera negatives by the Packard Campus film laboratory.

For more information on our programs, please visit the web site at www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

I like to include copyright descriptions whenever possible in these “Now Playing” posts, but when I saw the one for The Crowd Roars, I noticed something interesting–handwritten corrections to the screenwriting credits. It’s standard practice even today for the Copyright Office’s Motion Picture Examining Team to check the head credits of a film against the registration, so in this case it’s quite likely that an examiner in 1932 looked at the submitted print’s titles and corrected the “Adaptation and dialogue” credit.

screenwriting credit on the film print

 

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