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Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 3-5, 2018)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

Overboard (MGM/UA, 1987)

Thursday, May 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Overboard
(MGM/UA, 1987)
Spoiled heiress Joanna Stayton (Goldie Hawn) hires carpenter Dean Proffitt (Kurt Russell) to build a closet on her yacht, then refuses to pay when the project is completed. When Joanna accidentally falls overboard and loses her memory, Dean takes advantage of the situation to seek revenge. This romantic comedy was directed by Garry Marshall and includes Edward Herrmann, Katherine Helmond and Roddy McDowell (who also co-produced the film) in the cast. Overboard was the third and (so far) final movie that real-life couple Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell starred in together. A role-reversal remake starring Anna Farris and Eugenio Derbez is scheduled for release on May 4, 2018. 106 min.

Friday, May 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Rachel and the Stranger (RKO, 1948)
William Holden stars as a widowed farmer who takes an indentured servant, Rachel (Loretta Young), as his new wife, a marriage intended to be in name only, to help care for his son. The arrival of his old friend, a smooth-talking drifter (Robert Mitchum), threatens the burgeoning relationship of the bride and groom. Directed by Norman Foster, this charming pioneer love story was a box office hit and earned screen writer Waldo Salt a Writers Guild of America nomination for Best Written American Western. 80 min.

Saturday, May 5 (2 p.m.)
The Last Starfighter (Universal, 1984)
Trailer-park teenager Alex Rogan (Lance Guest) has become an expert at the video game Starfighter, which attracts the attention of a seemingly genial stranger (Robert Preston). The stranger turns out to be an alien in charge of a Star League who recruits Alex to fight in a real life-or-die battle with the wicked Kodan forces in outer space. Directed by Nick Castle, Jr., The Last Starfighter is one of the earliest films to employ extensive computer-generated imagery (CGI), used in the film to depict its many starships, environments and battle scenes. This was Robert Preston’s final role on the big screen, and his character, a “lovable con-man,” paid homage to his most famous role as Harold Hill in The Music Man (1962). 101 min.

Bell, Book and Candle (Columbia, 1958)

Saturday, May 5 (7:30 p.m.)
Bell, Book and Candle (Columbia, 1958)
Two months after completing work on Alfred Hitchock’s Vertigo, James Stewart and Kim Novak were reteamed for this romantic comedy based on the successful Broadway play by John Van Druten. Novak plays Gillian Holroyd, a witch in Greenwich Village, who admires from afar her neighbor, publisher Shep Henderson (Stewart). When she finds out that he is engaged to her old college enemy, Gillian casts a love spell on Shep, but then falls for him for real–but it’s a dilemma as witches who fall in love lose their supernatural powers. Rounding out the supporting cast are Jack Lemmon, Ernie Kovacs, Hermione Gingold and Elsa Lanchester and Pyewacket as Gillian’s Siamese cat and spirit guide. Directed by Richard Quine, Bell, Book and Candle received Academy Award nominations for Best Art Direction (Cary Odell and Louis Diage) and Best Costume Design (Jean Louis). 106 min.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (April 26-28, 2018)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, April 26 (7:30 p.m.) A Day at the Races (MGM, 1937) In this classic Marx Brothers comedy, veterinarian Hugo Z. Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) is hired as chief of staff for the financially troubled Standish Sanitarium at the insistence of wealthy hypochondriac […]

Mystery Photos: Who Am I?

Regular readers of the “Now See Hear!” blog know that for the past year or so, we’ve been trying to identify some super-obscure film- , TV- and music-related photos.  Though we’ve had an over 50% success rate, we still have some enduring “unknowns.”  To try to facilitate some more solutions, we’ve gathered 30 of our remaining mysteries below.  As […]

Vocal Recordings the Hard Way

Today’s post is by David Sager, Research Assistant in the Recorded Sound Research Center This blog relies on recordings from the Library of Congress’s National Jukebox, a resource with over 10,000 early recordings which is well worth exploring.  You can also hear thousands more rare recordings, including radio broadcasts from the 1930s, 40s, and 50s […]

Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (April 19-21, 2018)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, April 19 (7:30 p.m.) Rock & Roll on The Ed Sullivan Show, 1955-1970 The Ed Sullivan Show (CBS, 1948-1971) was a landmark television program, and unquestionably one of the most important chronicles of mid-20th century popular culture. The Motion Picture, Broadcast and […]

At the Packard Campus–May 2018

Thursday, May 3 (7:30 p.m.) Overboard (MGM/UA, 1987) Spoiled heiress Joanna Stayton (Goldie Hawn) hires carpenter Dean Proffitt (Kurt Russell) to build a closet on her yacht, then refuses to pay when the project is completed. When Joanna accidentally falls overboard and loses her memory, Dean takes advantage of the situation to seek revenge. This […]

Eleanor Roosevelt at the Library

This guest post was written by Christy Regenhardt, Editor, The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers, The George Washington University. Almost everyone knows about Eleanor Roosevelt. As a historian working on “ER,” I never have to tell people who she is. However, her popular image doesn’t include one of the most important facets of her career. She was a […]

Now Playing at the Packard Campus (April 12-14, 2018)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, April 12 (7:30 p.m.) Storm Center (Columbia, 1956) The first of three features scheduled to celebrate National Library Week (April 8 – 14); “Storm Center” is the story of a small town librarian (Bette Davis) who stands up to local pressure […]

Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (April 5-7, 2018)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Library of Congress. Thursday, April 5 (7:30 p.m.) Mostly Lost: Identifying Unknown Films at the Library of Congress (1911-1927) Did you ever wonder where those “once-thought-lost, just-rediscovered” films you hear about in the news from time to time were lurking? While some have been waiting […]