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Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (Jan. 3 – 5, 2019)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

The Thing from Another World (RKO, 1951)

Thursday, January 3 (7:30 p.m.)
The Thing from Another World (RKO, 1951)
Scientists and American Air Force officials at a lonely Arctic outpost uncover an alien aircraft buried in the ice. Once they melt through to the wreckage, the situation quickly escalates from unpredictable to terrifying. This classic blend of science-fiction and horror is noted for excellent performances (led by Kenneth Tobey, Robert Cornthwaite and Margaret Sheridan), tense direction (often credited to producer Howard Hawks), and the eerie score by Dimitri Tiomkin, which was one of the earliest science fiction films to use a theremin. James Arness, later of Gunsmoke fame, who was cast as The Thing, was a struggling movie actor at the time of the film’s making. The Thing from Another World was added to the National Film Registry in 2001. Digital presentation, 87 min.

Friday, January 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Journey into Fear (RKO, 1943)
Joseph Cotten scripted and stars in this adaptation of the Eric Ambler novel – a WWII spy drama about an American ballistics expert in Turkey who finds himself targeted by Nazi agents. Safe passage home by ship is arranged for him but he soon discovers that his pursuers are on board. The film also stars Dolores del Rio, Ruth Warrick, Agnes Moorehead, Jack Durant, Everett Sloane and Orson Welles. Although various sources conflict, Welles also co-directed (with Norman Foster), co-wrote and co-produced the film, though he is credited with none of these roles. We are showing a new 35mm print produced by the Library of Congress film preservation lab in May, 2018. 68 min.

The Shining (Warner Bros., 1980)

Saturday, January 5 (7:30 p.m.)
The Shining (Warner Bros., 1980 – rated R*)
Director Stanley Kubrick’s take on Stephen King’s terrifying novel has only grown in esteem through the years. The film is inventive in visual style, symbolism, and narrative as only a Kubrick film can be. Long and multi-layered, The Shining contains stunning visuals–rivers of blood cascading down deserted hotel hallways, disturbing snowy mazes, and a mysterious set of appearing and disappearing twins. Adding to the film’s esteem are iconic performances by Jack Nicholson as an aspiring writer and recovering alcoholic and Shelley Duvall as his wife who move to an isolated and ominous hotel in the Colorado Rockies to work as the off-season caretakers. “The Shining” was added to the National Film Registry on December 12, 2018. 35mm archival film print. 145 min. *Rated R, no one under the age of 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

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