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“Felicia”: National Film Registry #26

Next Wednesday, the Library announces its newest titles to the Registry.  But, first, we look back at 2014….

In 2014, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress added to its esteemed list the short documentary film, “Felicia,” about the life of a teenage girl, named Felicia Bragg, growing up in the Watts section of Los Angeles.

Alan Gorg, one of the filmmakers of “Felicia,” later wrote about how the film came to be made, stating:

“My involvement in the civil rights movement began while I was a student at UCLA. Residential areas and employment in California had been largely seg-regated historically and remained so until the 1960s. As a result, schools were mostly segregated, and there were only two African-American students in a student population over 2,000 at Hollywood High School when I attended. My education in the history of racial segregation in America came from black students I met at UCLA. They and the news reports made me conscious of what needed to be done.”

Read the rest of Mr. Gorg’s “Felicia” (PDF) account.

 

Title:  “Felicia”

Year of Release:  1965

Year Added to the National Film Registry:  2014  (See all films added to the Registry in 2014.)

This blog post is the 26th of 30 in our “30 Years of the National Film Registry” series which was launched to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Registry.  The National Film Registry selects 25 films each year showcasing the range and diversity of American film heritage to increase awareness for its preservation.  The 30th National Film Registry selections will be announced on December 12, 2018.

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