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From National Film Registry: What Are Your Favorite Films?

 

NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE FILMS FOR THE 2021 NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS SEPTEMBER 15, 2021

 

The Library of Congress invites you to submit your recommendations for the 2021 National Film Registry.

Under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act of 1988, the Librarian of Congress, with advice from the National Film Preservation Board, annually selects 25 titles that are deemed “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant, and are at least 10 years old.

Public nominations play a key role when the Librarian and the National Film Preservation Board are considering their final selections.

National Film Registry 2021 Nominations

We strongly encourage the recommendation of a full range of American films, including Hollywood classics, silent era titles, documentaries, educational and industrial movies, as well as films representing the vibrant diversity of cultures and influences of filmmakers: producers, directors, writers, actors, actresses, cinematographers, composers, and other crafts.

Not sure if your favorite films are already on the Registry?

Here is the current list of the 800 motion pictures already selected.

A compilation of some films not yet named to the Registry can be found here.

You may nominate up to 50 films through the online nomination form. Deadline is September 15, 2021.

For more information about the National Film Registry visit our website, or email us at [email protected]

10 Comments

  1. Peter. B.Steele
    September 7, 2021 at 8:43 am

    FAVORITE FILMS
    Elmer Gantry
    All That Jazz
    McTeague
    Night of the Hunter
    The Music Man
    Chan is Missing

  2. Angie
    September 7, 2021 at 9:20 am

    Signs

  3. Rose
    September 7, 2021 at 4:46 pm

    The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
    The Naked City (1948)
    How Green Was My Valley (1941)
    Crossfire (1947)
    DOA (1949)
    It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963)

  4. Tori Schmidt
    September 9, 2021 at 4:16 pm

    UHS (1989)

  5. Steve Connolly
    September 9, 2021 at 4:27 pm

    North by Northwest
    Casablanca
    D-Day (John Wayne version)
    Singing in the Rain
    White Christmas
    African Queen
    Battleground
    That Darn Cat
    Mary Poppins

  6. The Bear
    September 9, 2021 at 4:40 pm

    This film was based on a book by an author, James Oliver Curwood, who was from Owosso. It brought some national attention to Owosso when it was released in 1989. James Oliver Curwood built Curwood Castle as his writing studio and it is one of Owosso’s greatest tourist attraction. Mr. Curwood was known all over the world for his novels, short stories, and screenplays that he wrote.

  7. Steve Connolly
    September 9, 2021 at 4:56 pm

    That Darn Cat
    Mr. Blanding’s Builds His Dream House
    Charade
    It Takes a Thief

  8. Edith F Adams
    September 10, 2021 at 10:04 pm

    The Money Pit with Tom Hanks and Shelley Long has me crying with laughter after all these years. I believe most homeowners would relate to the effort to improve their home and the project goes sideways. Whether you decide this film has cultural relevance or not, I hope you will watch it and have a good laugh. As for me, I will watch it as therapy for my ego when I mess up a project.

  9. Derrick Bell
    September 14, 2021 at 6:28 am

    1979 was a good year
    Breaking Away
    The Warriors—“Can you dig it”…haha…cant believe its not in registry yet.

  10. Keith Morgan
    September 25, 2021 at 4:21 pm

    1)Used Cars Kirt Russell express and does what we all feel political leaders represent while adding an American president speech to the mix .2)Secondhand Lions and Overboard demonstrates the power of youth influence on all adults and adds comedy too. 3) But I’m a true fan of Gene Hackman and Tom Hanks both seem to give their time and devote themselves to a life of steady work not a paycheck level life.

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