{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/navcc.php' }

Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (June 27 – 29, 2019)

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

Thursday, June 27 (7:30 p.m.)
The Billy Taylor Show (WNJU, 1965)
Well-known jazz pianist, composer, broadcaster and educator Dr. Billy Taylor hosted two long-running programs on NPR: the pioneering Jazz Alive!, (1977- 1983) and Jazz at the Kennedy Center (1995-2001), and served as an on-air correspondent for CBS News Sunday Morning for many years. In 1965, Taylor hosted The Billy Taylor Show – Jazz in America, produced at WNJU in New Jersey that aired in the New York City market. Luckily he archived the 2” videotapes of the program before WNJU could recycle them and donated the tapes to the Library of Congress in 2002. This compilation of highlights from the show, none of which has been seen since the original broadcasts, includes performances by jazz greats Dizzy Gillespie, Kenny Burrell, Benny Powell, Clark Terry, Grant Green, Yusef Lateef, Jerome Richardson, Randy Weston and more.  Digital presentation.

Friday, June 28 (7:30 p.m.)
The Hidden Fortress (Toho, 1958)
A grand-scale adventure as only Akira Kurosawa could make one, The Hidden Fortress stars the inimitable Toshiro Mifune as a general charged with guarding his defeated clan’s princess (a fierce Misa Uehara) as the two smuggle royal treasure across hostile territory. Accompanying them are a pair of bumbling, conniving peasants who may or may not be their friends. This rip-roaring ride is among the director’s most beloved films and was a primary influence on George Lucas’s Star Wars. The Hidden Fortress delivers Kurosawa’s trademark deft blend of wry humor, breathtaking action, and compassionate humanity. 35mm film print courtesy of Janis Films. 139 min.

To Each His Own (Paramount, 1946)

Saturday, June 29 (7:30 p.m.)
To Each His Own (Paramount, 1946)
Olivia de Havilland has said that To Each His Own is one of her favorite films. Covering 27 years in the life of a woman who loved neither wisely nor well, it begins during the blitz on London. Middle-aged Jody Norris (de Havilland) is an air raid warden along with her confidante Lord Desham (Roland Culver.) When she learns that a handsome US pilot, John Lund, is in town, her thoughts flash back to an earlier time in her life, when her love affair with a dashing pilot (also played by Lund in a dual role) resulted in a life lived in secrecy. The film was a spectacular comeback for the actress after being off the screen for two years due to her legal battle seeking to end her contract with Warner Brothers. It was helmed by Mitchell Leisen with a script by the great Charles Brackett who was also Oscar nominated. Shown in celebration of Olivia de Havilland’s 103rd birthday on July 1. 35mm restored film print courtesy Universal Pictures Distribution, 122 min.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: //www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/

 

Jazz Appreciation in Moving Images and Recorded Sound

April is Jazz Appreciation Month! The Smithsonian National Museum of American History began this month-long celebration in 2001 to encourage people to listen to, read about, and play jazz music. Unsurprisingly, jazz is well-represented in the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division at the Library of Congress, from commercial recordings to film and more. […]

Jazz Appreciation in Moving Image and Recorded Sound

April is Jazz Appreciation Month! The Smithsonian National Museum of American History began this month-long celebration in 2001 to encourage people to listen to, read about, and play jazz music. Unsurprisingly, jazz is well-represented in the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division at the Library of Congress, from commercial recordings to film and more. […]

LIBRARY ADDS 25 NEW TITLES TO NATIONAL RECORDING REGISTRY!

This morning, the Library of Congress announced the newest 25 additions to its National Recorded Sound Registry.  Marking its 17th year this year, the National Recording Registry which honors all types of recorded sound–from music to spoken word to radio broadcasts—as long as the recordings have been historically, culturally or aesthetically significant. The latest 25 takes the […]

Rarities! Mystery! The Marty Alexander Collection

Today’s post is by David Sager, Research Assistant in the Recorded Sound Research Center. Marty Alexander, a chemist, collected rare 17th Century French furniture and art and also amassed one of the world’s most comprehensive and exotic collections of pre-WWII 78 rpm jazz recordings. After his death in 2009, the Library of Congress acquired the […]

At the Packard Campus Theater — October 2018

The Packard Campus Theater is highlighting contemporary women directors through the end of the year with a series of films from the 1970s to the present. Throughout the 1970s training and mentorship programs for women directors were established, including Women Make Movies (1972), the Women in Film Foundation (1973), the AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women […]

The First Jazz Recording: One Hundred Years Later

Today’s post is by David Sager, Reference Assistant in the Recorded Sound Section, Library of Congress. A momentous happening occurred on February 26, 1917 at the Victor Talking Machine Company, although no one quite suspected so at the time. Among the artists to be recorded that day—consisting of operatic baritone Reinald Werrenrath and tenor Lambert […]