Top of page

Category: National Recording Registry

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the National Film Registry: “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Eighty-three years ago, on October 19, 1939, the Capra classic “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” had its debut in–where else?–Washington, DC.  Named by the Librarian of Congress to the Library’s National Film Registry in 1989, “Mr. Smith” is, for better or worse, as timely today as it ever was.  In the essay below, the late …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

When Shawn Found Joni

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Since the start of her own illustrious career as a singer and songwriter, Grammy-winner Shawn Colvin has noted the important role that Joni Mitchell has played in inspiring and influencing her. Back in 2007, the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry welcomed Mitchell’s 1972 album “For the Roses” to its esteemed ranks.  Knowing of Ms. …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

Remembering Vin Scully (1927-2022)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Like the rest of the world, the Library of Congress is saddened to hear of the passing of the great Vin Scully.  Mr. Scully passed away on August 2nd, at the age of 95.  Not surprisingly, Mr. Scully is represented on the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry.  His broadcast of the September 8, 1957 …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the National Recording Registry: Van Cliburn, Russia and Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto, No. 1 (April 11, 1958)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

It was 64 years go this month that the US, in its then simmering Cold War with the Soviet Union, achieved one of its most startlingly and surprising victories.  All it involved was a yearly, Russian-sponsored music contest and an unassuming young piano virtuoso from Texas named Van Cliburn and his skilled beyond-his-years interpretation of …