Top of page

Category: National Recording Registry

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the Recording Registry: “The Girl From Ipanema” (1963)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Added to the Library’s National Recording Registry in 2004, “The Girl From Ipanema” is recalled by writer/musician Glenn Zottala. Astrud Gilberto In the 1960s–a very turbulent time in America–Stan Getz released “The Girl from Ipanema.” This became a huge hit both nationwide and worldwide. Who would have thought such gentle lyrical music would catch the …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TONY BENNETT!

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

As the great Tony Bennett turns 95 today, the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry, with the assistance of Bill Christine, looks at at the making of his signature hit, 1962’s “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.” By 1953, George Cory and Douglass Cross, who had met while pulling their stateside Army duty during …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the National Recording Registry: “Mama Tried” by Merle Haggard (1968)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

One of country music’s most iconic songs, by one of its most legendary artists, named to the Library’s National Recording Registry in 2015, is recalled by scholar Rachel Rubin. When Merle Haggard released “Mama Tried” in 1968, it quickly became his biggest hit. But, although in terms of broad reception, the song would be shortly …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the National Recording Registry: “16 Tons” by Tennessee Ernie Ford (1955)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Tennessee Ernie Ford’s legendary crossover hit, “16 Tons,” added to the Library’s National Recording Registry in 2014, is remembered here by author Ted Olson. In 1955, Tennessee Ernie Ford (born Ernest Jennings Ford on February 13, 1919, in Bristol, Tennessee) was an established recording star who could claim several major country hits as well as …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the Recording Registry: “Wichita Lineman” by Glen Campbell (1968)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

The great American songwriter, Jimmy Webb, who has written everything from “Up, Up and Away” to “MacArthur Park,” is, not surprisingly, represented on the Library’s National Recording Registry via his great composition “Wichita Lineman,” first recorded by Glen Campbell in 1968.  With the help of Kent Hartman, the Library today takes a look back at …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

HAPPY PRIDE! How “Y.M.C.A.” Became a Gay Anthem!

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Today, on the final day of Pride, the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry, with the help of author Josiah Howard, looks back at one of its most recent and best-known additions–the Village People’s “YMCA.”  Though, today, you’ll hear the track at everything from a school dance to a 50th anniversary party, it has also …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

On the Recording Registry: “The OKeh Laughing Record” (1922)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

“The OKeh Laughing Record” original label Imported into the United States in 1922, “The OKeh Laughing Record” is one of the most unusual, (in its way) influential, and surprisingly enduring novelty records ever recorded. Actually, there is nothing overly complicated about the recording itself. On it, a solo cornetist begins a rather slow, sad, even …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

On the Recording Registry: “Raisin’ Hell” by Run-DMC (1986)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Today is super-producer Rick Rubin’s birthday and, not surprisingly, Rubin has long been a member on the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry.  His 1986 work with Run-DMC on their legendary album “Raisin’ Hell,” was added to the NRR in 2017.  In the essay below, writer Bill Adler looks at the album’s innovation and influence. Released …