Top of page

Category: Recorded Sound

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

When Shawn Found Joni

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Since the start of her own illustrious career as a singer and songwriter, Grammy-winner Shawn Colvin has noted the important role that Joni Mitchell has played in inspiring and influencing her. Back in 2007, the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry welcomed Mitchell’s 1972 album “For the Roses” to its esteemed ranks.  Knowing of Ms. …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

An Actor, a Singer, a Writer, a Director: The Library of Congress Remembers Adam Wade

Posted by: Laura Jenemann

Last month, we were saddened to learn of the passing of Adam Wade.  While his name may not be top-of-mind, his career is certainly one to be celebrated. Wade was a singer, musician, actor, and the first Black American to host a nationally-televised game show. The Library of Congress National Audio-Video Conservation Center hosts a …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

Putting Sketch Comedy on Record

Posted by: Library of Congress

The following post is by David Sager of the Library of Congress’ Recorded Sound Division. During the early 1900s, the act of making a phonograph record was an uncomfortable proposition. For one thing, efficient positioning before the recording horn required as much attention as the performance itself. Performers had the additional concern of needing to …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

They Start the Victrola and Go Dancing Around

Posted by: Library of Congress

They Start the Victrola by Billy Murray This post was written by Recorded Sound Reference Specialist David Sager Recorded dance music needs no introduction, it has been a staple of the recording industry for decades. Whether techno, disco, rockabilly, or ballroom – records are for dancing! When Billy Murray described the dancers on the recording …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

VE Day: This Is Not a Drill!

Posted by: Matthew Barton

This post originally appeared on this blog in May of 2020. As detailed in the previous blog post, VE Day – Take One, Monday, May 7, 1945, was a day of confusion and restrained celebration for CBS Radio and the news media in general. Tuesday, May 8, however, brought clarity and all out jubilation. Speaking …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

VE Day: Take One

Posted by: Matthew Barton

The following post originally appeared on this blog in May of 2020. The Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) and other radio networks all covered the last hours of World War II in Europe in depth, and these recordings are preserved in the Library of Congress, where they are available for listening in the Recorded Sound Research Center …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

From the National Recording Registry: “Singin’ the Blues” (1927)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

Ninety-five years ago today–February 4, 1927–Frankie Trumbauer and his Orchestra with Bix Beiderbecke headed into the studio to lay down their classic “Singin’ the Blues.”  “Blues” was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry in 2005.  In the essay below, the Library’s own David Sager recounts the making of a legendary recording. “Singin’ …

A view looking past a digital display screen towards the doors of an indoor theater, with

HAPPY THANKSGIVING! Let’s visit “Alice’s Restaurant” (1967)

Posted by: Cary O’Dell

For many, it has become as much of a Thanksgiving tradition as turkey and dressing.  Arlo Guthrie’s immortal recording “Alice’s Restaurant Massacre” was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry in 2017.  Not long after, music journalist Hank Reineke kindly wrote about it for the Library.  In honor of this holiday, we share …