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Category: Recorded Sound

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Margaret Rupli, NBC War Correspondent

Posted by: Karen Fishman

This blog post was written by Matt Barton, curator of the Recorded Sound Section. Margaret Rupli (also known as Margaret Rupli Woodward, 1910 – 2012), a native of Washington, DC, had a long and distinguished career in public service. Her career as a war correspondent for NBC radio was much shorter, lasting only from January …

Arch Oboler and His Bathyspheres

Posted by: Matthew Barton

  “Arch Oboler, a restlessly intelligent man…utilized two of radio’s great strengths: the first in the mind’s innate obedience, its willingness to try to see whatever someone suggests it see, no matter how absurd: the second is the fact that fear and horror are blinding emotions that knock our adult pins from beneath us and …

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The Women Who Founded an Industry

Posted by: Bryan Cornell

With the end of Women’s History Month approaching, the Library’s Recorded Sound Section would be remiss if we failed to mention the remarkable accomplishments of Barbara (Cohen) Holdridge and Marianne (Roney) Mantell, founders of Caedmon Records.   These two Hunter College graduates with degrees in Greek wanted careers in publishing, but weren’t particularly excited about …

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All Going Out and Nothing Coming In

Posted by: Karen Fishman

Today’s post is by David Sager, Research Assistant in the Recorded Sound Research Center. In observance of Black History Month, we’re highlighting a little known song by the great Bert Williams, found in the Library’s National Jukebox. Although opportunities for African American performers during the early days of the recording industry were scant, they certainly …

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Jimmy Dorsey and NBC Bandstand

Posted by: Karen Fishman

This post was written by Matt Barton, curator of the Recorded Sound Section. The Big Band era and the Golden Age of Old Time Radio were long past in the summer of 1956, when NBC Bandstand hit the airwaves. Live performances by the great dance orchestras had been a staple of network radio in the 1930s …

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James Farley and Early Radio Recordings

Posted by: Karen Fishman

Today’s post is by Harrison Behl, Reference Librarian at the Recorded Sound Research Center. Shortly after the formation of the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division in 1978, one of our first reference librarians, James Smart, compiled a listing of the radio broadcast recordings the Library had acquired to that point. Covering the years …

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The Billy and Marlene VerPlanck Collection

Posted by: Karen Fishman

This blog post was written by Matt Barton, curator of the Recorded Sound Section. It’s not unusual for the Recorded Sound Section and the Music Division to share custody of a collection, with Recorded Sound taking the recordings and the Music Division taking the written scores of a particular artist. But the Billy and Marlene …

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Native Gems: Highlights from the Native American Audio Project

Posted by: Karen Fishman

This blog post was written by Sally Smith and Brianna Gist, 2019 Jr. Fellows in the Recorded Sound Section. The Native American Audio Project began as a response to an “Ask-a-Librarian” question submitted by a patron inquiring about recordings of Native American music in the Recorded Sound Section of the Library. Although the American Folklife …