Taking to the Streets: New York World-Telegram & Sun Staff Photos

New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection overview page (detail).

New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection overview page (detail).

Photographers working on staff for the New York World-Telegram & Sun newspaper captured many aspects of life in the decades between the 1920s and the 1960s, focusing on faces, flavors, and phenomena in New York City.

The Library of Congress’ New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection includes photographs of worldwide events that the newspaper acquired from commercial sources. But concentrating on the photographs made by the photographers who were on the newspaper’s staff holds appeal, not only for the window it provides on the evolution of the city and its concerns, but because those are the photographs that the donors were able to place in the public domain, so they can be used without restriction.

Looking at the staff photographs reminds us that the streets of the city were regularly the site of protests and demonstrations, where groups communicated their opinions and hopes. Walking through the 1950s and 1960s staff photographs, for instance, we see Teamster Union members picketing City Hall about wages and pensions in 1954.

City employees picket City Hall. Photo by Dick DeMarsico, 1954.  //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c26870

City employees picket City Hall. Photo by Dick DeMarsico, 1954.
//hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c26870

In 1962, members of the Women Strike for Peace organization cautioned President Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

800 women strikers for peace on 47 St near the UN B[uilding]. Photo by Phil Stanziola, 1962. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c28465

800 women strikers for peace on 47 St near the UN B[uilding]. Photo by Phil Stanziola, 1962. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c28465

Three years later, marchers declared their support for civil rights demonstrators in Selma, Alabama, by taking to the streets in Harlem.

Marchers carrying banner lead way as 15,000 parade in Harlem. Photo by Stanley Wolfson, 1965 March. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c35695

Marchers carrying banner lead way as 15,000 parade in Harlem. Photo by Stanley Wolfson, 1965 March. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c35695

A photograph of a 1967 march suggests a variety of perspectives in play, as police on horseback observe demonstrators carrying placards in support of the war in Vietnam and other pedestrians, who are not carrying signs, make their way against the tide of marchers. A street sign suggests the march had reached 3rd Avenue. Newspaper accounts from 1967 suggest just how regularly protestors took to the street to express their views on the war.

Demonstrators, marching in a downtown area, with flags and placards in support of the war in Vietnam, police on horseback in background. Photo by Matthew Black, 1967. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c30141

Demonstrators, marching in a downtown area, with flags and placards in support of the war in Vietnam, police on horseback in background. Photo by Matthew Black, 1967. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c30141

The life of a city runs through its homes and businesses as well as its streets, and through intimate encounters as well as public declarations. The New York World-Telegram & Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection covered all of these and offers a window into a city as it honored tradition and, at the same time, evolved with the times.

Learn More:

One Comment

  1. Caroline Kennedy
    June 26, 2018 at 5:49 pm

    I accompanied the NY World-Telegram & Sun society columnist, Joseph X Dever down to the newspaper offices every night between the years 1964 and 1966. Then the paper merged with the New York Journal Tribune and was called the World Journal Tribune.

    Those were heady days for me as a young rookie journalist from the UK. I learnt a lot about how a newspaper operates and what makes a good journalist.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.