Caught Our Eyes: Canine Cart Trip

Photo preservation specialist Donna Collins recently added this photo to the “eye catching” images we share on our conference room  wall.

Man and dogs on rail cart trip from Shelton to Nome. Photo by Wheeler, 1912 July 28. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.02480

Man and dogs on rail cart trip from Shelton to Nome. Photo by Wheeler, 1912 July 28. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.02480

Donna noted, “For those of us who’ve shared the joyful experience of inviting an enthusiastic dog (or two) to hop in the car for a ride, the composition of this photo recently caught my eye. It captures roughly nine or ten dogs catching a ride on an Alaskan rail cart trip. What was especially noteworthy was the way this group of canine companions so neatly formed themselves into a pyramid.”

This is one of the lucky instances where the photo came with a fair amount of information on it – a caption spelling out the where, what and when. We had the added benefit of information from a descendant of Walter W. Johnson, the man on the cart. He was a mining engineer and designer of gold and tin dredges, who traveled around the Seward Peninsula on the family “pupmobile” and on horseback. His granddaughter supplied this information from the back of his copy of the photo: “When it was time to coast, the dogs would jump aboard without command.”

Keep your eyes peeled for future highlights from our “Caught Our Eyes” staff sharing wall!

The "Caught Our Eyes" wall, where Prints & Photographs Division staff share "finds" from the collections. Look for some of these in future posts! Photo by P&P staff, 2018 Feb. 28.

The “Caught Our Eyes” wall, where Prints & Photographs Division staff share “finds” from the collections. Look for some of these in future posts! Photo by P&P staff, 2018 Feb. 28.

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