Camera and Locomotive: Two Tracks across the Continent: Seeing the Railroad in 3D

The following is the fifth in a series of guest posts by Micah Messenheimer, Associate Curator of Photography, Prints and Photographs Division, that discuss the parallel development of two technologies in the 19th century: railroads and photography.

Capturing the entirety of the Central Pacific Railroad from 1864–69, photographer Alfred Hart (1816–1908) traveled east from Sacramento, California, documenting engineering efforts through mountains and deserts on the way to the line’s meeting with the Union Pacific at Promontory, Utah. After a career as a painter of portraits and moving panoramas, Hart moved to California in the 1860s, where he likely learned to operate a camera while working as a retoucher in a daguerreotype studio. By 1863, he was advertising his services as a traveling photographer in the state’s mining towns.

Deep cut at Trail Ridge. Length 1,000 feet. Stererograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00466

Deep cut at Trail Ridge. Length 1,000 feet. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00466

Profile Rock, near the first crossing of the Truckee River. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00562

Profile Rock, near the first crossing of the Truckee River. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00562

Hart specialized in stereo views and had an intuitive understanding of elements that would best showcase the three-dimensional effects of the format: sharp angles, curving tracks, and layered foregrounds and backgrounds brought his scenes to life. Unlike Hart’s counterpart, Andrew J. Russell, who would spend long stretches in the field (read about Russell’s work in a previous post), Hart would travel along the line for short periods of days or weeks, then return to his Sacramento studio to print. This working style was aided by his privileges as official photographer—the company transported his full-size photographic darkroom wagon and he had authority to halt work for the purposes of making an image.

In documenting the entirety of the Central Pacific Railroad construction from Sacramento to Ogden, Utah, Hart was among the first photographers to picture a major engineering project from start to finish.

Compared to Russell, Hart’s photographs reflect a more pronounced interest in the technical prowess required to construct the line. This aligned with company interests to assuage doubts that the rugged terrain of the Sierra Nevada could be traversed by a locomotive.

Particularly notable are a series of images of snow sheds. Thirty-seven miles of timber structures were built by the Central Pacific to allow year-round operation through areas prone to deep snow and avalanches.

Snow gallery around Crested Peak. Timbers 12x14 inches, 20 inches apart. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00577

Snow gallery around Crested Peak. Timbers 12×14 inches, 20 inches apart. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00577

While Hart often climbed high above the construction, or placed himself in precarious positions on top of railway cars or above tunnel entrances to make his pictures, most of his images include the rail line or evidence of its construction in process. Unlike Russell, he rarely moved ahead of the work at the end of the line.

American River, from Green Bluffs. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00522

American River, from Green Bluffs. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00522

As Russell had, Hart often turned his lens toward the laborers building the miles of track for the railroad. In the case of the Central Pacific, these work crews initially were comprised largely of Chinese-Americans already residing in California, and later of laborers contracted directly from China. Attempts to record the flurry of work were limited by photographic technology. The wet plate collodion negatives used required long exposure times and movement resulted in blurring. For this reason, most of these images show activity at a pause.

End of track, on Humboldt Plains. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00618

End of track, on Humboldt Plains. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00618

Prospect Hill Cut. Upper slope, 170 feet. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00486

Prospect Hill Cut. Upper slope, 170 feet. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00486

Central Pacific attorney Judge Edwin B. Crocker was Hart’s primary backer. Beginning in 1866, Hart supplied negatives to the company. The Central Pacific developed a final presentation series of 364 stereo views titled and sequenced to emphasize the feat of construction and a narrative of progress. These stereo cards were distributed widely as sets and reproduced as engravings in popular publications like the San Francisco Sunday Mercury and Harper’s Weekly. Negatives that were not selected for the final Central Pacific Railroad set were sold to the San Francisco publishing firm Lawrence & Houseworth.

Advance of civilization. End of track, near Iron Point. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00621

Advance of civilization. End of track, near Iron Point. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00621

Hart was also involved in promoting and publishing his own work for the railroad. He sought commercial work on the side and advertised his connections with the railroad to earn it.

In 1869, Crocker resigned from the Central Pacific board after a stroke. At this time, the company’s commercial arrangement with Hart ceased and he would be replaced by Carleton Watkins, who was a boyhood friend of Central Pacific vice-president Collis P. Huntington. Hart sold a number of his stereoview negatives to Watkins, who later published them under his own name.

Donner Lake, 110 miles from Sacramento. Eastern summits 25 miles distant. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00515

Donner Lake, 110 miles from Sacramento. Eastern summits 25 miles distant. Stereograph by Alfred Hart, between 1865 and 1869. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s00515

Railroad companies would be primary patrons of photographers through the nineteenth-century as additional lines were built to traverse new routes across the country and connect to existing networks. A hundred and fifty years later, the pictures that resulted from the pairing of the two technologies continue to bring to life the epic accomplishment of building a railroad across the United States.

Learn More:

 

3 Comments

  1. Wilbert Brown
    June 27, 2018 at 2:13 pm

    My Grand Daddy and Uncles used to show me pictures like these. Good to see American Reconstruction.

  2. Gene / KG7XD
    June 28, 2018 at 9:36 am

    It is interesting to look at these stereographs and let one’s eyes merge the left and right images into the blended stereograph. If you don’t believe this can actually be done, prove it to yourself. Copy the original picture, insert a small L and R on a different spot on each picture. Then look at it and let your eyes merge the two frames. You’ll see both added letters on one frame. I find it helpful to use my hands to block the unmerged frames from the sides and just see the merged image in the middle.

    Try it, but don’t overdo it. It’s easy to end up with a headache very quickly.

    Enjoy!

  3. Chris Whitehouse
    July 5, 2018 at 5:09 am

    I love your amazing collection of stereo images…except one!
    You have a terrific image of the Chicago Cubs dugout during the 1929 World Series, but it is only in very low resolution.
    I have restored and colored well over a hundred of your baseball images (2D) and would just love to do this 3D one.
    Please put up the high resolution!
    Thank you.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.