A Look Inside Creative Spaces and Studios

The studio of an artist–the place that allows an artist’s creativity to bloom–always raises so many questions. Is it chosen for some magical combination of the lighting, the location, the size of the artwork involved or types of tools needed? Is it messy, or tidy? Bare bones or full of luxurious decoration? Is it purely a place of work or a place for leisure and friends to visit?

Luckily, we sometimes can sneak a peek into the place that creators worked in and satisfy our curiosity and answer some of these questions. Explore the studios of artists, photographers, and one architect– some famous, others less well-known–in the photos below:

[Interior of Frances Benjamin Johnston's studio at 1332 V St. NW, Washington, D.C., showing a large camera mounted on wheels] Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston, circa 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.04835

[Interior of Frances Benjamin Johnston’s studio at 1332 V St. NW, Washington, D.C., showing a large camera mounted on wheels] Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston, circa 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.04835

[Sculptor Walton Ricketson's art studio, New Bedford, Mass.] Photo by Thomas E.M. White, between 1860 and 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s08561

[Sculptor Walton Ricketson’s art studio, New Bedford, Mass.] Photo by Thomas E.M. White, between 1860 and 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s08561

Whistler in his studio. Photo by G. P. Jacomb Hood, between 1880 and 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.04895

[James McNeill] Whistler in his studio. Photo by G. P. Jacomb Hood, between 1880 and 1900. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.04895

Sculptor working on bust of J.J. Hill. Photo by Bain News Service, 1909 June 23. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.04010

Sculptor working on bust of J.J. Hill. Photo by Bain News Service, 1909 June 23. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.04010

Baker family group, Mrs. Baker posing. Photo by National Photo Company, circa 1920. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.29098

Baker family group, Mrs. Baker posing. Photo by National Photo Company, circa 1920. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.29098

Painting studio of C. Warde Traver, Central Park, New York. Photo by Bain News Service. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.04549

Painting studio of C. Warde Traver, Central Park, New York. Photo by Bain News Service. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.04549

R. M. Hunt's Studio, Newport, R.I. Photo by Frank H. Child, circa 1890. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.10184

R. M. Hunt’s Studio, Newport, R.I. Photo by Frank H. Child, circa 1890. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.10184

Stettheimer, Florine, Miss, studio. Photo by Arnold Genthe, 1936. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/agc.7a01973

Stettheimer, Florine, Miss, studio. Photo by Arnold Genthe, 1936. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/agc.7a01973

Daniel C. French in the Chesterwoord studio working on the bust of Ambrose Swasey. Photo by Swasey, 1922. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a44827

Daniel C. French in the Chesterwoord studio working on the bust of Ambrose Swasey. Photo by Swasey, 1922. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a44827

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