The Wonders of the WPA Poster Collection

The following is a guest post by Hanna Soltys, Reference Librarian, Prints & Photographs Division.

The Work Projects Administration (WPA) Poster Collection is one of the Library’s treasures. We’ve hosted many orientations in person and online about these posters, and this time we’re offering an introduction to the collection during the evening hours!

On Thursday, July 7, at 7:00pm EST, I will host a virtual webinar that discusses the collection history, topical themes represented in the posters, and how to download images. I will share some of my favorite poster designs, such as this reading-focused one by Arlington Gregg.

A book mark would be better! Poster by Arlington Gregg, between 1936 and 1940. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.31264

In addition, the presentation will discuss the different types of processes you can find among the more than 900 posters, including silkscreens, lithographs, and woodcuts, as seen in the example below, encouraging visits to the zoo.

Visit the zoo. Woodblock print, between 1936 and 1941. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.08248

To our knowledge, the Library holds the largest known collection of WPA Posters, and plenty more examples and designs will be shown during the webinar. Join us!

Learn more:

3 Comments

  1. Amy Shields
    June 30, 2022 at 10:36 am

    Gorgeous art and design. It would be so lovely if we could put artists and designers back to work reminding people of No Mow May, Save Water, Recycle.

    Then we’d have the CCC start up again. Who wants to revisit those days with me?!

  2. Sarah Gallagher
    July 3, 2022 at 12:17 am

    Is this webinar available for viewing after the fact…
    As in now? Best, SWG

    • Kristi Finefield
      July 5, 2022 at 10:25 am

      Hello,
      Thanks for your comment. The session has not yet occurred, it will be livestreamed on July 7th at 7pm EST and a recording will be made available. See this link for more information.
      Kristi Finefield

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