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The Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, 2019 Nov. 3. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.60797

Finding Pictures: In Celebration of National Arab American Heritage Month

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April is National Arab American Heritage Month. Save an hour this Wednesday afternoon to get a peek into how the Prints & Photographs Division’s collections provide visual insight into the lives and accomplishments of Arab Americans. Sara W. Duke, Curator of Popular and Applied Graphic Art, will share a wide array of images related to Arab Americans with family connections to many countries in the Arab world. Register here. If you can’t make it to the live talk, the virtual presentation will be recorded and available on our website in the near future.

You will see the work of such photographers as Zaida Ben-Yusuf, with Algerian roots through her father, and known for her artistic portraiture at the turn of the 20th century.

The odor of pomegranates. Photo by Zaida Ben-Yusuf, circa 1900. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.15875

Donna Shalala, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services under President Clinton, was the first Lebanese-American to serve in the Cabinet.

Donna Shalala, Secretary of Health and Human Services. Photo by Michael Geissinger, 1998. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppss.01000

A young Kahlil Gibran, poet, writer and artist of Lebanese descent, poses in the circa 1898 photo below:

[Kahlil Gibran]. Photo by F. Holland Day, circa 1898. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cns.00163

The Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, is depicted here in a contemporary photo by Carol M. Highsmith.

The Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, 2019 Nov. 3. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.60797

We hope you will join us to see many more images from our collections.

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