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Laddie boy's birthday cake, 7/25/22. Photo by National Photo Company, 1922 July 25. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.06726

Finding Pictures: Presidential Pets

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Dogs, cats, horses, and cows – as well as far more unusual animals – have called the White House and its grounds home over the last two centuries. Join me, Reference Specialist Kristi Finefield, for a visual tour of the menagerie of animals that have been Presidential pets on Wednesday, October 18th at 3pm EDT. Register here.

Hundreds of animals have lived around or inside the White House. Here is a sneak peek of just a few that will make an appearance in my presentation:

On the White House lawn. Major Russell Harrison, Harrison children, Baby McKee & sister in goat cart [pulled by Old Whiskers]. Washington, D.C. Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston, between 1889 and 1893. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.71381
[Socks, the First Family’s cat during the Clinton presidential administration, on the lawn of the White House, Washington, D.C.] Photo, between 1993 and 2001. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.72767
Mrs. Coolidge at garden party [with Prudence Prim in bonnet], 6/3/26. Photo by National Photo Company, 1926 June 3. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.15926
[Theodore Roosevelt Jr. with Eli Yale, a hyacinth macaw, in the White House conservatory]. Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston, 1902. https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.71384

Laddie boy’s birthday cake, 7/25/22. Photo by National Photo Company, 1922 July 25. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/npcc.06726
Pete, pet squirrel at the Executive Mansion, is causing Laddie Boy to look to his laurels. Photo by National Photo Company, 1922 Oct. 10. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c31903

 

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