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First meeting of the War Production Drive Policy Committee on October 19, 1942, in Washington, D.C. Photo by George Danor, October 19,1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b01547

Posters Working Together

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I love to keep an eye out for photos from the P&P collections that show posters being displayed. I then search the poster collection to see if we have a copy of the actual poster. Here are some of the better examples from the World War II era.

A 1942 poster by Jean Carlu, produced by the Office of War Information, can be seen hanging in the Pacific Parachute Company in San Diego, CA, with three employees posed in front of it, in this photo from the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Collection:

Negro, Mexican, and White girls are employed at this plant. Pacific Parachute Company, San Diego, California. Photo by Russell Lee, April 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d03450

Here is the poster:

Production, America’s answer! Lithograph by Jean Carlu, 1941. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g07085

Children in New York City line up to buy war stamps and bonds. Uncle Sam urges them on from the classroom wall.

Italian-American children buying stamps and bonds at Public School Eight on King Street, New York, New York. Photo by Marjorie Collins, December 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8d24226

Some posters appear in multiple photos! The Buy War Bonds poster also can be seen hanging in another classroom in this John Vachon image from the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Color Photographs Collection:

Rural school children, San Augustine County, Texas. Photo by John Vachon, April 1943. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a35427

The poster by N.C. Wyeth:

Buy War Bonds. Lithograph by N.C. Wyeth, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.12471

A Boy Scout sits in front of the U.S. Capitol holding a United We Are Strong poster:

Untitled. Photo probably by John Rous, 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8e02088
United We Are Strong, United We Will Win. Lithograph by Henry Koerner, 1943. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g12529

Truck lights shine on a Men Working Together poster hung in a “Middlewestern copper and brass plant,” probably the Chase Brass and Copper Company of Euclid, Ohio:

Signs posted through out the mills of this Middlewestern copper and brass plant. Photo by Alfred T. Palmer, February 1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8e10913
Men Working Together. Lithograph by the Office of Emergency Management, 1941. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ds.08153

Participants in the first meeting of the War Production Drive Policy Committee pose in front of five posters. The posters are captioned with the number of copies distributed of each:

First meeting of the War Production Drive Policy Committee on October 19, 1942, in Washington, D.C. Photo by George Danor, October 19,1942. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8b01547
The author with five War Production Board posters from the Library’s collection. Photo by P&P staff, 2024.
The War Production Board posters without the author. Photo by P&P staff, 2024.

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