Focus on Eyeglasses

My latest Flickr album focuses on depictions of eyeglasses in the collections of the Prints & Photographs Division. Many of the images in the group are photographs, but a number of posters and prints appear as well. I added two WPA (Work Projects Administration) posters to the mix. Take a look at some equally worthy WPA posters featuring eyeglasses that weren’t included in the album.

Be kind to books club Are you a member? Poster by Arlington Gregg, between 1936 and 1940. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b48892

What about India? Poster by Maurice Merlin, between 1941 and 1943. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.33812

When I look at the next poster, I see a monocle on the left eye of the cancer quack. Though I suppose it could also be a stylized eye or a physician’s head mirror. What do you think?

Beware the Cancer Quack. Poster by Max Plattner, between 1936 and 1938. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b48897

Finally, let me share one of my favorite WPA posters. As you will see, there are no eyeglasses visible, but the clear implication of the design is that eyeglasses may solve John’s problems:

John is not really dull – he may only need his eyes examined. Unattributed poster, 1936 or 1937. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3f05332

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