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Category: Collections Care

A rolling cart with three shelves full of books.

Register Now: Assessing the Physical Condition of the National Collection

Posted by: Bobbi Hinton

Join us, at The Library of Congress or virtually, as we discuss “Assessing the Physical Condition of the National Collection (ANC)”. This Andrew W. Mellon funded project has collected data from over 2500 volumes to compare the physical, chemical and optical characteristics of 500 “identical” books from five large research libraries in distinct regions of …

At-risk General Collection books. Photo Credit: Ronald J. Murray

2022 Librarian in Residence Reflection

Posted by: Aaron D. Chaletzky

This is a guest post by Brandi Marulli, 2022 Librarian in Residence, Preservation Directorate. Support of the next generation of librarians and leaders is an integral part of the mission of The Library of Congress, with a multitude of people of all ages and backgrounds serving in 80 different programs. The Internship and Fellowship Programs …

Modeling New Ways to Approach Preservation Program Administration

Posted by: Amelia Parks

Preservation administration is much like other types of management and administration, except that our bottom line isn’t financial profit. Instead, the goal comes in two parts: maximize the usability of collections in the present tense, and do that in ways that improve their odds of usability in the future. Read on to see how see how the Preservation Directorate is changing approaches to functional organization and budget planning to achieve these goals at the Library of Congress.

Four portrait images depict the Jordan family, one man and three women, in sepia tones.

Treatment of Crayon Enlargements from the Nelson W. Jordan Family Papers

Posted by: Lily Tyndall

Read more to learn about the Nelson W. Jordan Family Papers, a collection of correspondence, scrapbooks, genealogical information, and more from this important African-American family. Nelson W. Jordan was born a slave, and was a soldier and a minister; his family continued to be active community members in Virginia and New Jersey. This post details the conservation treatment of crayon enlargements depicting the family's patriarch, Nelson Jordan, and two of his daughters, Julia and Carrie.