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Category: Preservation

At-risk General Collection books. Photo Credit: Ronald J. Murray

2022 Librarian in Residence Reflection

Posted by: Aaron D. Chaletzky

This is a guest post by Brandi Marulli, 2022 Librarian in Residence, Preservation Directorate. Support of the next generation of librarians and leaders is an integral part of the mission of The Library of Congress, with a multitude of people of all ages and backgrounds serving in 80 different programs. The Internship and Fellowship Programs …

Modeling New Ways to Approach Preservation Program Administration

Posted by: Amelia Parks

Preservation administration is much like other types of management and administration, except that our bottom line isn’t financial profit. Instead, the goal comes in two parts: maximize the usability of collections in the present tense, and do that in ways that improve their odds of usability in the future. Read on to see how see how the Preservation Directorate is changing approaches to functional organization and budget planning to achieve these goals at the Library of Congress.

Copying selected files onto an external hard drive. Photo credit: Amanda May

Portable and Complex – Preserving Born-Digital Data on Laptops

Posted by: Aaron D. Chaletzky

This is a guest post written by Amanda May, Digital Projects Specialist in the Preservation Services Division. Her work includes managing digital files for the division, recovering data from removable media in Library collections, and providing consultation and services for born-digital collections data. Born-digital preservation work most often begins with a physical object – a …

Image showing four pictures of cabinets, with books, parchment, paper and CDs

What a CHARMing Collection!

Posted by: Amelia Parks

One unique and CHARMing collection at The Library of Congress is made up of other peoples’ discards, handmade replicas, and miscellany. A non-collection as it were, it is an amalgamation of reference samples and materials used by preservation scientists to expand discovery and research opportunities.

Four portrait images depict the Jordan family, one man and three women, in sepia tones.

Treatment of Crayon Enlargements from the Nelson W. Jordan Family Papers

Posted by: Lily Tyndall

Read more to learn about the Nelson W. Jordan Family Papers, a collection of correspondence, scrapbooks, genealogical information, and more from this important African-American family. Nelson W. Jordan was born a slave, and was a soldier and a minister; his family continued to be active community members in Virginia and New Jersey. This post details the conservation treatment of crayon enlargements depicting the family's patriarch, Nelson Jordan, and two of his daughters, Julia and Carrie.