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Archive: 2012 (41 Posts)

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Thinking About Peace Through Library of Congress Primary Sources

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

For centuries, national and global leaders have appeared to take important steps toward peace, while still pursuing political concerns. The Library of Congress’s collections of primary sources can encourage students to explore the impact of a variety of peace settlements and how we can find peaceful solutions in our own lives.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Crossing the Delaware: General George Washington and Primary Sources

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

When I've asked my students, “Would anyone be interested in a trip on a ferry?” they've all cheered with excitement. But I wonder how many of us would be brave enough to take a night voyage through an ice-clogged river on a boat battered by snow and high winds. Primary sources from the Library of Congress can let students explore this momentous--and shivery--event.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Edward S. Curtis and The North American Indian

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

Photographs offer a snapshot of a particular time and place, telling a careful viewer as much about the photographer as about the subjects of the pictures. That’s often particularly true when the photographer isn’t a member of the group being photographed. One example from the Library of Congress’s collections is Edward S. Curtis, who dedicated most of his career to photographing Native American cultures and traditions to publish in a multi-volume book titled The North American Indian.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Voting Rights for Women

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

The original Constitution of the United States was nearly mute on voting rights, ceding them to the states to determine. This, the second of two posts exploring the struggles of two groups to gain full voting rights, will take a look at the long road toward the full enfranchisement of women.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Voting Rights – The Full Enfranchisement of African Americans

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

The original Constitution of the United States was nearly mute on voting rights, ceding them to the states to determine. The 15th Amendment to the Constitution confers voting rights on African Americans, declaring that “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”