Celebrating Constitution Day with Primary Sources

Constitution Day is September 17, and here are some resources for learning more and teaching about this important day in United States history:

George Washington's Annotated copy of the Constitution of the United States, September 12, 1787

George Washington’s Annotated copy of the Constitution of the United States, September 12, 1787

Explore this primary source set to find primary sources to download and use in your classes, plus a Teacher’s Guide with background information and teaching suggestions. This primary source set is also available as an ebook.

Compare two versions of the preamble of the Constitution.

James Madison, President of the United States. Thomas Sully and David Edwin

James Madison, President of the United States. Thomas Sully and David Edwin

Celebrate the “Father of the Constitution,” James Madison, and explore his papers.

Learn more about the history of the Magna Carta, a predecessor to the Constitution.

The Law Library of Congress provides links to legislative and other resources relating to the celebration of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. Also explore Constitution Annotated from Congress.gov which contains legal analysis and interpretation of the United States Constitution, based primarily on Supreme Court case law.

The Digital Reference Section has gathered a variety of resources on the Constitution, its history, and its impact on the United States and its people.

How will you commemorate Constitution Day this year? Let us know in the comments. Your ideas might show up in a future Constitution Day blog post.

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